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Now Pay Delinquent Real Property Taxes Online
Eaton County Treasurer, Bob Robinson, announced this month that Eaton County property owners have a new and convenient way to make delinquent tax payments.  The treasurer’s office has contracted with Official Payments, a leading provider of electronic payment solutions to offer delinquent tax payment processing over the Internet through credit card and debit card transaction.  Visa, Discover, and MasterCard debit and credit cards will be accepted. This new service offers taxpayers a fast and efficient way to pay online and reduces manual processing time in the treasurer’s office.

“Through a unique partnership with Official Payments and BS&A Software, taxpayers can get online, pay, and process their delinquent tax payments instantly, in real time,” said Robinson.  “This is part of our ongoing work to increase efficiency in the treasurer’s office.  It can also help folks avoid last minute additional fees and interest on their past due real property taxes.”

For more information, go to http://www.eatoncounty.org/departments/county-treasurer 


New Legislation Extending Property Tax Exemptions to Qualified Disabled Veterans

Click here for more information.


Solar Power Energy Generation Statistics

Click here to view how many kwh have been produced by Eaton County's Solar Panel.

 


Eaton Good Food Plan

 Click here for more information.

 

Domestic Violence

 

UPDATED: November 27, 2013

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Domestic Violence statutes
  Adrianne Van Langevelde
Adrianne Van Langevelde

Domestic Violence Specialist

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Help for domestic violence victims

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What does it mean?

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Did you know ... ?

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What to do?

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Links

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Michigan's Domestic Violence Statutes


Michigan laws define "domestic violence" as an assault or an assault & battery by a

ballpink spouse
ballpink former spouse
ballpink person residing or having resided in the same household as the victim
ballpink person having a child in common with the victim
ballpink person with whom he/she has or has had a dating relationship

Michigan has two levels of domestic violence:

Domestic Assault   [MCL 750.81]
Victim need not be injured!
Criminal penalties (+ possible probation, counseling, community service, etc.):
1st conviction (misdemeanor): up to 93 days in jail and/or $500 fine
2nd conviction (misdemeanor): up to 1 year in jail and/or $1,000 fine
3rd or more conviction (felony): up to 5 years in prison and/or $5,000 fine

 

Aggravated Domestic Assault   [MCL 750.81a]
Victim must receive serious or aggravated injuries (such as injuries requiring immediate medical attention)
Criminal penalties (+ possible probation, counseling, community service, etc.):
1st conviction (misdemeanor): up to 1 year in jail and/or $1,000 fine
2nd conviction (felony): up to 5 years in prison and/or $5,000 fine

Since 2002, a person arrested for Domestic Violence cannot be released from jail on an interim bond set by the jail. The person must be held until he or she can be arraigned, or has an interim bond set by a judge or district court magistrate. The judge or magistrate's interim bond can include conditions, such as having no contact with the victim. (See 2001 PA 198.)

Other, more serious assault crimes can occur in domestic relationships -- such as Assault With a Dangerous Weapon (felony - up to 4 years and/or $2,000), Assault With Intent to Commit Great Bodily Harm Less Than Murder (felony - up to 10 years or $5,000), Assault With Intent to Commit Murder (felony - Life, or any number of years), etc. -- but they are not specifically charged as "domestic 'versions'" of those crimes, with different "domestic" penalties.

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What Does "Domestic Violence" Mean?


Domestic Violence is defined by the Penal Code as an assault or an assault & battery that is committed by (i) a spouse, (ii) a former spouse, (iii) a person residing or having resided in the same household as the victim, (iv) a person having a child in common with the victim, or (v) a person with whom he/she has or has had a dating relationship.

Domestic Violence has been defined by the Domestic Violence Act as a non-self defense act that:

  • causes or attempts to cause physical or mental harm to a family or household member,
  • places a family or household member in fear of physical or mental harm,
  • causes or attempting to cause a family or household member to engage in involuntary sexual activity by force, or duress, and/or
  • engaging in activity toward a family or household member that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested.

The Domestic Violence Act defines "family or household member" as (i) a spouse or former spouse, (ii) a person with whom the defendant resides or has resided, (iii) a person with whom the defendant is or has engaged in a sexual relationship, (iv) a person to whom the defendant is related or was formerly related by marriage, or (v) a person with whom the defendant has had a child in common, or (vi) the minor child of one of these people.

Domestic violence has also been viewed as a learned pattern of physical, verbal, sexual and/or emotional behaviors in which one person in a relationship uses force and intimidation to dominate or control the other person. The partners may be married or not married; heterosexual, gay or lesbian; living together, separated or dating. Domestic violence occurs in all ages, races, genders and social classes.

The violence takes many forms and can happen all the time or once in a while. Examples of domestic violence are:

ballpink physical assault or abuse --- hitting, pushing, shoving, slapping, choking, punching, kicking, grabbing, beating, throwing her down, tripping, twisting arms, biting, using a weapon

ballpinkthreatened physical harm

ballpinksexual assault or abuse --- unwanted, forced sexual activity, making her do sexual things against her will, physically attacking the sexual parts of her body, etc.

ballpinkstalking

ballpinkintimidation

ballpinkemotional abuse --- mind games, name-calling, put-downs, making the victim feel bad about herself

ballpinkjealousy --- a sign of possessiveness and lack of trust

ballpinkcontrolling behavior and forced isolation (from family or friends) --- controlling what the victim does, who the victim sees or talks to, where the victim goes, relocating to a remote area, etc.

ballpinkeconomic abuse --- preventing the victim from getting or holding a job, and controlling the purse-strings by withholding money, taking her earned money, giving her an allowance, making her ask for money, etc.

An important step to help yourself or someone you know prevent or stop violence is recognizing the warning signs listed on the Violence Wheel.

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fist-r If you are in an abusive relationship ...pointing


 

You are not alone!
You are not to blame!
You can get help!

ballpink Get medical attention if you have been physically injured.

ballpink Save evidence to document the abuse (medical records, photographs of injuries and damage to your property, etc.).

ballpink Make a safety plan, which may include figuring out the "warning signs" that come before abuse:

  • protect your children
  • work out signals with neighbors to call the police
  • ask a friend or relative to stay with you
  • decide where you can go and what to take with you if you must leave (money, important documents, spare clothes, car keys, etc.)
  • [Also, review our safety plan brochure.]
ballpink Report domestic violence and stalking to the police!They can & will:
  • protect you from immediate danger, and help you and your children get out of the house safely;
  • arrest the abuser without a warrant when there is reasonable cause to believe that an assault has taken place or that the abuser has violated a Personal Protection Order or a restraining order;
  • advise you of available shelter programs and other services in your area;
  • write out a police report which can be used to help prove the abuse occurred and show good cause for a judge to grant a personal protection order or a restraining order.
    If you have a PPO, which the defendant is violating, download our Stalking Victim's Log! acrobat

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    info

    Resources Available for
    Domestic Violence Victims




    Get Crime Victim Forms & Brochures
    at our
    Downloads page!
      
    See our Crime Victim Assistance Resources pages
    for more resources in Michigan, and nationally
      

     


     

     

    Police

      If your situation is an emergency, call 911!

      Otherwise, call the nearest Eaton County police department.

     

     

    Shelters

     

    ballpink24 hour confidential crisis hotline

    ballpinkshelter for victims and their children

    ballpinkcrisis intervention

    ballpinkinformation and referrals

    ballpinklegal advocacy

    ballpinkhousing assistance

    ballpinktransportation

    ballpinkchild care

    ballpinkindividual counseling and support groups

    ballpinkassistance in developing a safety plan.

     

      Domestic violence shelters can provide safe, short-term housing, information, and assistance in considering all the options available to victims. They can also help break down the isolation victims have experienced in their abusive relationships and provide support from others who have been through similar experiences. Shelters provide a variety of supportive services which are confidential and free of charge:

       

      SHELTERS IN & AROUND EATON COUNTY
      S.A.F.E. Place
      (269) 965-SAFE (7233) [Crisis Line]
      (888) 664-9832 [Crisis Line / Toll-Free]

      (269) 965-6093
      (269) 966-2503 [Fax]
      PO Box 199
      Battle Creek, MI 49016
      SERVICES:Advocacy, shelter, and information to survivors of domestic violence.
      logo safe place
      SIREN / Eaton Shelter
      (517) 543-4915 [24-hr Crisis Line]
      (800) 899-9997 [24-hr Crisis Line]
      (517) 543-0748 [Office]
      P.O. Box 293
      245 S. Cochran
      Charlotte, MI 48813
      SERVICES:Emergency shelter, transitional housing, crisis counseling, etc to homeless families & battered women in Eaton County. Also, 24-hour crisis line, weekly support groups, referrals to legal assistance for abused women (available for residents and non-residents of the shelter).
      siren eaton shelter
      Green Gables Haven
      (800) 304-5445 [Toll-Free]
      (269) 945-4777 [Office]
      E-mail: greengableshaven@sbcglobal.net
      P.O. Box 388
      Hastings, MI 49058
      SERVICES:Green Gables Haven provides a temporary, secure, nurturing environment and support to enable victims of domestic violence in Barry County to make appropriate life-altering changes.
      GGH offers shelter for an abused person with their children for up to 4 weeks; access to the shelter 24-hours/day; access to clothing, personal hygiene items, food and/or emergency transportation while in the shelter; advocacy to assist in legal, medical and social matters; counseling, support groups, information and referrals; children's activities and groups; and mentoring programs.
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      Eve, Inc. (End Violent Encounters)
      [formerly called the Council Against Domestic Assault, or CADA]
      URL: www.eveinc.org
      (888) 796-5522 [24-hr Crisis Line / Toll-Free]
      (517) 372-3382 [Office]
      (517) 372-0024 [Fax]
      P.O. Box 14149
      Lansing, MI 48901
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      MSU Safe Place
      (517) 372-5572 [24-hr Crisis Line]
      (517) 355-1100
      SERVICES:Advocacy, shelter info, 24-hour support line, individual counseling, women's relationship group, support group. Community & corporate education. Batterer counseling & referral. MSU Safe Place is for MSU students, faculty, staff, retirees or their partners, and children who are experiencing an emotionally, physically or sexually abusive relationship. All services are free and confidential.
      msu safe place

     

    Hospitals

    • EATON RAPIDS COMMUNITY
      1500 S. Main, Eaton Rapids, MI
      Phone: (517) 663-2671

     

    • HAYES-GREEN BEACH
      321 Harris St., Charlotte, MI 48813
      Emergency Room: (517) 543-9507
      www.HGBhealth.com

     

    • INGHAM REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER / GREENLAWN
      401 Greenlawn, Lansing, MI 48910
      Emergency Department: (517) 334-2286
      General Information: (517) 334-2121
      www.irmc.org

     

    • INGHAM REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER / PENNSYLVANIA
      2727 S. Pennsylvania, Lansing, MI 48910
      Phone: (517) 372-8220
      www.irmc.org

     

    • SPARROW
      1215 E. Michigan Ave., Lansing, MI
      Phone: (517) 483-2700
      www.sparrow.com

     

    • ST. LAWRENCE
      1210 W. Saginaw, Lansing, MI
      Phone: (517) 372-3610
      www.sparrow.com
    •  

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    Did You Know ... ?

     

    ... domestic violence affects a large percentage of our community?

    • 1 in 4 women will experience domestic violence. (Patricia Tjaden & Nancy Thoennes, National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence" (2000)); National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • An estimated 1,300,000 women are victims of physical assault by an intimate partner each year. ("Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States", 2003. Centers for Injury Prevention and Control. Atlanta, GA; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • A woman is beaten every 15 seconds. (Bureau of Justice Statistics, "Report to the nation on Crime and Justice. The Data." Washington DC Office of Justice Program, US Dept. of Justice. Oct 1983)
    • The majority (73%) of family violence victims are female. Females were 84% of spousal abuse victims, and 86% of abuse victims in dating relationships. (US Dept of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, "Family Violence Statistics" June 2005; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women between ages 15 and 44 in the United States - more than car accidents, muggings, and rapes combined. (Uniform Crime Reports, Federal Bureau of Investigation,1991)
    • Females who are 20-24 years of age are at the greatest risk for intimate partner violence. (US Dept of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, "Intimate Partner Violence In the United States" December 2006; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • Historically, females have been most often victimized by someone they knew. (US Dept of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, "Criminal Victimization, 2005" September 2006; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • 28% of high school and college students surveyed said that they had experienced violence in a dating relationship. (Levy, Barry (1991). Dating Violence: Young Women in Danger, Seattle, WA, Seal Press)
    • 43% of teenage girls (age 14-17) report knowing someone their age who has been hit or beaten by a boyfriend. (Children Now/Kaiser Permanente poll, December 1995)
    • One in 6 women and one in 33 men have experienced an attempted or completed rape. (US Dept of Justice, "Prevalence, Incidence, and Consequences of Violence Against Women" November 1998; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • Sexual assault is reported by 33% to 46% of women who are being physically assaulted by their husbands. (American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Adolescence. Sexual Assault and the Adolescent. Pediatrics. 1994.)
    • Nearly 7,800,000 women have been raped by an intimate partner at some point in their lives. ("Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States", 2003. Centers for Injury Prevention and Control. Atlanta, GA; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • 1 in 12 women and 1 in 45 men will be stalked in their lifetime. (Tjaden & Thoennes (1998), "Stalking in America", National Institute for Justice; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • 81% of women stalked by a current or former intimate partner are also physically assaulted by that partner, and 31% are also sexually assaulted by that partner. (Tjaden & Thoennes (1998), "Stalking in America", National Institute for Justice; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • In 55% of the cases where men are assaulting their partners, they are also assaulting their children. The battered mother may be suffering from physical and psychological injuries to the point that she cannot meet the needs of her children appropriately. (Murray A. Straus and Richard J. Gelles, Physical Violence in American Families, 1990.)
    • Battered women are more likely to suffer miscarriages and to give birth to babies with low birth weights. (Surgeon General, United States, 1992)
    • 63% of the young men between the ages of 11 and 20 who are serving time for homicide have killed their mother's abuser. (March of Dimes, 1992)


    ... assaults against females are under-reported to police?

    • Only about ¼ of all physical assaults, 1/5 of all rapes, and ½ of all stalkings against females by intimate partners are reported to the police. (Patricia Tjaden & Nancy Thoennes, National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence" (2000); National Coalition Against Domestic Violence);
    • Domestic violence is one of the most chronically under-reported crimes. (Patricia Tjaden & Nancy Thoennes, National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence" (2000); National Coalition Against Domestic Violence);
    • Rape remains the most under-reported violent crime in America. Only 16%, or approximately one of every six rapes, are ever reported to the police. Of the reported rapes, one quarter were reported to police more than 24 hours after the rape occurred. (National Victim Center and Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, "Rape in America: A Report to the Nation", 1992)
    ... battering is not just a "momentary loss of temper?"
    • "One in five women victimized by their spouses or ex-spouses report they had been victimized over and over again by the same person." (The Basics of Batterer Treatment, Common Purpose, Inc., Jamaica Plain, MA)
    • If violence occurs once in a dating relationship, it is likely to occur again. (Levy, Barry (1991). Dating Violence: Young Women in Danger, Seattle, WA, Seal Press)
    • Battering is the establishment of control and fear in a relationship through violence and other forms of abuse. The batterer uses acts of violence and a series of behaviors, including intimidation, threats, psychological abuse, isolation, etc. to coerce and to control the other person. The violence may not happen often, but it remains as a hidden (and constant) terrorizing factor. (Uniform Crime Reports, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1990)


    ... domestic violence frequently produces serious injuries?

    • Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury for women age 15 to 44. More women are injured from domestic violence than rapes, muggings and auto crashes combined.
    • Michigan State Police statistics show that a Michigan woman is killed by a partner or former partner every 5 days.
    • Almost 1/3 of female homicide victims are killed by an intimate partner, according to police records. (FBI, Uniform Crime Reports "Crime in the United States, 2000" (2001); National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • 76% of female homicide victims had been stalked by the person who killed them. (McFarlane, et al, (1999), "Stalking and Intimate Partner Femicides" National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • Less than 1/5 of victims reporting an injury from an intimate partner sought medical treatment following the injury. (US Dept of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, "Intimate Partner Violence in the United States"e; December 2006; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • Intimate partner violence results in more than 18,500,000 mental heath care visits each year. ("Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States", 2003. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GA; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • In 1996, approximately 1,800 murders were attributed to intimates. The victim was female in almost 75% of the cases. (Patricia Tjaden & Nancy Thoennes, National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the US" (2003)
    • 20% of female homicide victims are between 15-24 years old. (Barry Levy (1993). In love and Danger, Seattle, WA, Seal Press)


    ... intimate partner violence has a large economic impact on our nation?

    • The cost of intimate partner violence exceeds $5.8 billion each year, $4.1 billion of which is for direct medical and mental health services. ("Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States", 2003. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GA; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • Victims of intimate partner violence lost almost 8 million days of paid work because of the violence perpetrated against them by current of former husbands, boyfriends and dates. This loss is the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs, and almost 5.6 million days of household productivity as a result of the violence. ("Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States", 2003. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GA; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • There are 16,800 homicides, and $2.2 million (medically treated) injuries due to intimate partner violence annually, which costs $37 billion. ("The Cost of Violence in the United States", 2007. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GA; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)


    ... intimate partner violence has a significant effect on children -- the next generation of parents?

    • Witnessing violence between one's parents or caretakers is the strongest risk factor of transmitting violent behavior from one generation to the next. (Break the Cycle web site; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • Boys who witness domestic violence are twice as likely to abuse their partners and children when they become adults. (Stauss, Gelles and Smith (1990), "Physical Violence in American Families: Risk Factors and Adaptation to Violence&wuot; in 8,145 Families. Transaction Publishers; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • 30% to 60% of perpetrators of intimate partner violence also abuse children in the household. (Patricia Tjaden & Nancy Thoennes, National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence" (2000); Edelson, J.L. (1999), "The Overlap Between Child Maltreatment and woman Battering", Violence Against Women, 5:134-154; National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)


    ... leaving an abusive relationship is not "easy"?

    • The most dangerous time for a woman who is being battered is when she leaves, according to a study by the United States Department of Justice.
    • In Michigan, 75% of the women who are killed by their partners are murdered after the relationship is over or as it ends.
    • Women who leave their batterers are at a 75% greater risk of being killed by the batterer than for those who stay. (Barbara Hart, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 1988)
    • About 20% of the 1.5 Million people who experience intimate partner violence annually obtain civil protection orders. (Patricia Tjaden & Nancy Thoennes, National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence: Findings From the National Violence Against Women Survey" (2000); National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)
    • Nationally, 50% of all homeless women and children are on the streets because of violence in the home. (Sen. Joseph Biden, U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Violence Against Women: Victims of the System, 1991)
    • There are nearly three times as many animal shelters in the United States as there are shelters for battered women and their children. (Senate Judiciary Hearings, Violence Against Women Act, 1990)


    ... most battered women do leave violent relationships?

    • Many battered women do leave their abusers permanently and succeed in building a life free of violence. Almost all battered women leave at least once.


    ... domestic violence knows no boundaries?

    • People of all socio-economic classes, races, religions, ethnic backgrounds, and sexual orientations can be victims of domestic violence. Many statistics have been gathered from lower-class families, but only because lower-class women are more likely to request assistance from agencies, so their problems are more visible. Many upper-class victims fear making their battering public because of social embarrassment and fear that it may harm their husband's careers. (Schulman, MA. "A Survey of Spousal Violence Against Women in Kentucky." Washington, DC. U.S. Government Printing Office, 1979)
    • Women of all cultures, races, occupations, income levels, and ages are battered - by husbands, boyfriends, lovers and partners. (Surgeon General Antonia Novello, as quoted in Domestic Violence: Battered Women, publication of the Reference Department of the Cambridge Public Library, Cambridge, MA)
    • "Approximately one-third of the men counseled (for battering) at Emerge are professional men who are well respected in their jobs and their communities. These have included doctors, psychologists, lawyers, ministers, and business executives." (For Shelter and Beyond, Massachusetts Coalition of Battered Women Service Groups, Boston, MA 1990)
    • Violence is the reason stated for divorce in 22% of middle-class marriages. (EAP Digest November/December 1991)


    ... married women are not the only victims of domestic violence?

    • People who are dating, separated, living together, divorced, have a child in common and/or are married, can be abused. Domestic violence can occur in any of these relationships.
    • Approximately 80% of sexual assaults against women are perpetrated by assailants known to the victim (friends, acquaintances, intimates, and family members). Acquaintance rape is particularly common among adolescent victims. (American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Adolescence. Sexual Assault and the Adolescent. Pediatrics. 1994)
    • Male victims represent 5% of reported sexual assaults. (Heise, L.L. Reproductive freedom and violence against women: where are the intersections? J Law Med Ethics. 1993.)
    • 28% of high school and college students surveyed said that they had experienced violence in a dating relationship. (Levy, Barry (1991). Dating Violence: Young Women in Danger, Seattle, WA, Seal Press)
    • If violence occurs once in a dating relationship, it is likely to occur again. (id.)
    • Young people tend to interpret the violence of their partner as signifying love. (id.)
    • Adolescents, especially adolescent girls, are at a greater risk for sexual assault then any other age group. Adolescents who are sexually assaulted are at a greater risk for sexual assault as an adult. Of the women who reported being raped at some time in their lives, 22% were under 12 years old and 32% were 12 to 17 years old when they were first raped. (Prevalence, Incidence, and Consequences of Violence Against Women: Findings From the National Violence Against Women Survey, National Institute of Justice, 1998)
    • Young people tend to interpret the violence of their partner as signifying love. (Levy, Barry (1991). Dating Violence: Young Women in Danger, Seattle, WA, Seal Press)
    • Many teens do not identify forcible sex as sexual assault. In one study over 50% of high school boys and 42% of high school girls believed that there are times when it is "acceptable for a male to hold a female down and physically force her to engage in intercourse." (National Crime Center and Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center. Rape in America: A Report to the Nation. Arlington, VA; 1992:1-16)


    ... women are not "just as violent as men"?

    • In 95% of domestic assaults, the man is the perpetrator of the violence. (Bureau of Justice Statistics. Report to the Nation on Crime and Justice. The Data. Washington, DC. Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, October 1983)
    • Male violence against women does much more damage than female violence against men; women are more likely to be injured than men (Murray A. Straus and Richard J. Gelles, Physical Violence in American Families, 1990)
    •  

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    links-32

    Links

    ABA Commission on Domestic Violence   [American Bar Association]

     

    DomesticViolence.org
    web version of the Domestic Violence Handbook, created in Oakland County, Michigan.

     

    Family Violence Prevention Fund
    a national, non-profit organization that focuses on domestic violence education, prevention and public policy reform. Includes a Celebrity Watch, which chronicles celebrities in the news either as victims or perpetrators of domestic violence, and domestic violence "On the Air".

     

    Minnesota Center Against Violence & Abuse
    research education, scholarly papers on criminal justice, batterers' intervention, etc., access to resources

     

    Michigan Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence

     

    Michigan Domestic Violence Prevention and Treatment Board
    Created in 1978. Responsible for administering state & federal funding to battle domestic violence

     

    Michigan Resource Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence

     

    Midland County Friend of the Court --- Domestic Violence Information
    excellent summary of signs of control & power; early warning signs of abuse; myths/facts about domestic violence; how victims can be helped; effects of abuse on children; and more.

     

    National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (1-800-THE-LOST)

     

    International Child Protection Center

     

    Shattered Love, Broken Lives
    60-article series on domestic violence, including interviews, images, links to related info and resources

     

    Violence Against Women [US Dept. of Justice]

     

    Yahoo! search re: domestic violence

     

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