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Office of the Eaton County Sheriff 

 

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Sheriff Tom Reich

1025 Independence Blvd
Charlotte, Michigan 48813

517-543-3512 or 517-372-8217

 

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Eaton County Sheriff's Weekly Updates

Weekly Update

December 28, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

27 Alarms 35 Car/deer accidents
22 Cars in the ditch 14 Check well beings
18 Domestic disputes 25 Shoplifting complaints
19 Larcenies 20 Motorist assists
26 Operating while impaired 9 Personal injury crashes
59 Property damage crashes 17 Suspicious situations
23 Traffic hazards 115 Traffic stops
26 Traffic violations 21 Vacation checks

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 725 calls for service.

On 12/20/2016 at 0618 hours, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office deputies were dispatched to a two-vehicle accident, with injury, which occurred on the on-ramp to S/B I-69 from Hartel Road in Potterville, MI.  One vehicle was a red Ford Focus station wagon, and the other vehicle was a red Chevy Silverado pickup.  Two males were involved, one from each vehicle.

The Ford Focus had run out of gas on S/B I-69 just south of Hartel Road and the driver was pushing his vehicle out of the roadway, across the on-ramp from Hartel Road, and onto the shoulder on the right side of the on-ramp.  The Chevy Silverado was southbound on the on-ramp from Hartel Road, attempting to get onto S/B I-69.  The two vehicles collided on the on-ramp, with the front of the Chevy Silverado striking the rear driver’s side corner of the Ford Focus.  It is unknown if the Ford Focus had any vehicle lights on at the time of the crash.

The driver of the Chevy Silverado was evaluated at the scene by EMS and refused additional medical treatment as he was basically uninjured.  The person pushing/steering the Ford Focus from outside the vehicle was struck by his own vehicle after the initial impact and suffered non-life-threatening injuries.  He was given initial treatment by EMS and then transported by ambulance to a Lansing area hospital.

Alcohol is NOT believed to be a factor in the accident.

If you are leaving for an extended length of time don’t forget to visit our webpage and click on the Vacation Check Request – or call our office at 517-543-3512.

Since 1791 there have been a total of 19,298 Law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty as of 2012. During that same time period there have been 541 officers killed in the state of Michigan. Three of those 541 officers worked here at Eaton County. Deputy Cleo Platt was shot and killed in Charlotte in 1927. Deputy Don Rice was hit and killed by a drunk motorist while he assisted a stranded motorist on Lansing Road near Stewart Road in 1985. The third deputy was Deputy Dean Foster who gave his life in Delta Township on New Year’s Day 1967.

Law Enforcement Officers sacrifice a great deal doing the job they love—working holidays, missing their kid’s ball games, working night shifts---and they do this to ensure that the public can live free and enjoy the American Dream. When most people are in bed, they are the ones out there chasing down bad guys and putting themselves in harm’s way. They do not become rich from this job; they do it because we love it. Unfortunately, sometimes an officer has to give the ultimate sacrifice with his life. It is very important that we do not forget these officers and celebrate their lives and contributions.

All three of our deputies were killed around the holidays. Imagine what the holidays were like for their loved ones and how every year around that time what feelings this provokes.

There is a memorial to Deputy Dean Foster so that many years from now, people would be able to see a picture of him, see the story and never forget the sacrifice he and his family made so we could be a little safer when we sleep in bed at night. A copy of that memorial hangs in Delta Township Hall, Eaton County Sheriff’s Delta Patrol headquarters and the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office in Charlotte.

Under a lion statue at the National Police Memorial in Washington DC there is a quote from a survivor—“It is not how these officers died that made them heroes, it is how they lived”

Dean Foster grew up in the Jackson area. He met his wife (Margit) at Sparrow Hospital where she worked as a respiratory therapist. Dean was a saxophonist and played in the Dean Foster Jazz band. Dean and Margit had a German Shepherd named “Count” that he had planned on using as a police dog. Dean was a Grand Ledge Policeman for a short period before he worked at Eaton County Sheriff’s Department. Dean was described as a go-getter by many of his co-workers and also was described as a very fair man. Dean and Margit married in 1966 and were married for 9 months at the time of his murder.

Imagine Delta Twp in 1967, and specifically the area of Saginaw Highway and Waverly Road. Saginaw Highway was three lanes at the time and on the north/west side of the intersection was a gas station, then there was Sully’s—a very popular drive in restaurant. Just west of Sully’s was the intersection of Saginaw and Thomas L Pkwy. On that corner was Neal Trealor’s Sinclair’s Service station. This station was a full service gas and service station. Deputy Foster was working day shift alone and was completing his shift heading back to Charlotte when then dispatcher Ladd Reither took a call of a suspicious situation at the gas station.

The Female caller advised something strange going on at the station as two subjects not known to work at the station were going in and out of the station and they did not appear to know how to work the pumps. Deputy Foster was dispatched back up to Delta to check out the call. Deputies Gene Hoag and Joe Pinch just came on duty and were also dispatched to assist him but were some distance behind as they were coming from Charlotte. Dean did not know that these two suspects had shot the clerk, Harold Peterson and were now waiting on gas customers and pocketing the cash.

The suspects, Jerry Talison and Jerry Aikens had gone to the station to take money from the till after talking to Peterson about fixing their car. Peterson had taken their keys to their car so he could look at the problem. The two decided to shoot Peterson and then take the money. Deputy Foster arrived a short time later and left his car running in the lot. Witness accounts say that Deputy Foster unsnapped his holster and motioned the two subjects back into the station. The windows to the station were very foggy, however witnesses heard popping noises shortly after the three entered the station. A voice was then heard on the police radio saying “hello, hello I think one of your deputies has been assaulted”. This was a witness that got on the radio. Another witness across the street saw the suspects remove the cash register and place it into a 1960 Rambler and both fled in the Rambler.

Deputies Hoag and Pinch arrived a short time later and found both Deputy Foster and Harold Peterson shot inside the station.

The suspects in their haste had left their car at the station as they could not find the keys. Sheriff’s officials soon knew the suspects identity due to the car left and other evidence found at the station. The Rambler was later located in the City of Lansing.

Suspect Talison was turned in by his bond agent days after the incident as he was out on bond for another similar type robbery. Suspect Jerry Aikens was found in New York City after a nationwide manhunt. Both were tried in Eaton County and convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison. A fingerprint of Aikens was found and identified in the Rambler and was a big piece of evidence. Both suspects are still incarcerated today in the Michigan Department of Corrections. Talison filed an appeal and it was denied due to the hard work of the Eaton County Prosecutors office, specifically Assistant Prosecuting Attorney William Worden.

The same day there was another related line of duty death—Officer Gerald Rosa of the Battle Creek Police Department was manning a roadblock in attempt to apprehend Fosters killers when he was struck and killed by an out of control driver.

Deputy Dean Foster—we salute you and you are not forgotten.

 (authored by Eaton County Sheriff's Lt. Mark Wriggelsworth)


Weekly Update

December 21, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

28 Alarms 12 Assist   citizens
21 Car/deer   accidents 98 Cars in the   ditch
24 Check well   beings 16 Domestic disputes
40 Shoplifting 29 Motorist   assists
16 Operating   while impaired 7 Personal   injury crashes
79 Property   damage crashes 17 Suspicious   situations
36 Traffic   hazards 93 Traffic   stops
14 Traffic   violations    

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 803 calls for service.

“A COP’S CHRISTMAS PRAYER”

Dedicated to all those who give up
so much, that others may enjoy peace
and security during Christmas and all
holiday seasons.

Christmas morn comes early,
For the Cop out on his beat.
His family home around the tree
As he cruises a lonely street.

The sound of tearing paper,
The glow in his young child’s eye,
The merry toast his Father made
That Christmas fore he died.

The scattered toys that lay beneath
The tree as it starts to shed,
These are the thoughts that give him pause,
As he bowed his head and said,

Father, faithfully I have tried to protect
My fellow man this year.
My Christmas wish, keep safe my own,
For I cannot always be near.

Grant me the strength I'll need this day
To complete what e'er the task,
Keep safe this lowly servant Lord,
Is all my family would ask.

As I travel down many lonely roads,
While o’er my beat I roam,
Please help me show my brother
That he stands not all alone.

He raised his head to check his runs
As a thought began to grow,
A Child was born this blessed day
Those many years ago,

He fought a righteous battle
As he traveled land and sea.
He too had come to protect and serve
His brother, just like me.

By

Deputy Dennis “Sledge” Hammer

Marion County Sheriff Department (Indiana)

Used with Special Permission of the Author
Copyright © December 25, 1998 - All Rights Reserved


Weekly Update

December 14, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

28 Alarms 26 Assist   citizens
18 Car/deer   accidents 77 Cars in the   ditch
16 Check well   beings 17 Domestic disputes
23 Shoplifting 23 Larcenies
17 Motorist   assists 9 Operating   while impaired
16 Personal   injury crashes 98 Property   damage crashes
15 Suspicious   situations 24 Traffic   hazards
106 Traffic   stops 21 Traffic   violations

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 855 calls for service.

On December 7th at approximately 4:30 a.m. Eaton County Deputies located a driver that was driving south in the northbound lane of Lansing Road near Potterville. Driver was arrested and charges are being sought for Operating While Intoxicated.

Eaton County Sheriff’s Delta Patrol Deputies are investigating several cars that were broken into in the area of Ridge and Walmar on December 8th. Anyone with information is asked to call 517-323-8480.

On Saturday December 10 and Sunday December 11 Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to numerous cars in the ditch and crashes. Fortunately, no serious incidents or injuries.

WINTER DRIVING SAFETY

The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office and the Michigan Sheriffs' Association recommend the following tips to keep you and your family safe while driving in winter weather:

  • No matter the season,  drinking and driving is dangerous and illegal.
  • Make sure your  vehicle is in good working order.
    • Have working wiper blades
    • Fill up on antifreeze and window-washer fluid
    • Check for proper tire inflation
    • Ensure your battery  has sufficient charge
  • Keep an emergency kit ready in your vehicle. It should include:
    • A blanket or warm clothes (boots, coat, gloves)
    • A flashlight
    • Jumper cables
    • Tow rope
    • Shovel
    • Bag of sand or cat litter for traction
    • Battery-operated  radio
    • State map to use in  case of a detour
    • Snacks such as raisins, candy bars or other items that store well
  • To avoid slipping off the roadway, drive more slowly and give yourself more room to stop.
    • Brake gently to prevent skidding
  • If your vehicle does get stuck:
    • Never spin your  wheels. That only digs the tires in more deeply
    • Use a shovel to dig around the wheels and undercarriage
    • Turn the steering wheel from side to side to clear snow away from the front tires
    • Gently ease the vehicle out
    • If that doesn't  work, try rocking the vehicle by shifting into forward and giving it some gas and then shifting it into reverse and accelerating until the vehicle is free
  • Let other people know your travel plans so if you don't arrive they'll know where to start  looking.
    • Tell people the route you plan to take
  • Make sure your  vehicle has fresh air if you become stuck by checking the exhaust system to see if it's plugged by snow. Check the news for  weather reports or visit weather sites such as www.weather.gov.
    • Open a window or turn off your car if necessary
    • Carbon monoxide produced by your vehicle is a colorless, odorless gas that can kill

Yours in Public Safety

Sheriff Tom Reich


December 7, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

38 Alarms 17 Assist citizens
31 Car/deer accidents 25 Car in the ditch
17 Check well beings 17 Domestic disputes
25 Shoplifting complaints 28 Shoplifting
22 Larcenies 13 Motorist assists
8 Operating while impaired 50 Property damage crashes
8 Personal Injury crashes 21 Suspicious Situations
15 Suspicious vehicles 36 Traffic hazards
196 Traffic stops 19 Traffic violations

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 920 calls for service.

On December 10, 1985 at 8:55 p.m., Eaton County Deputy Don Rice was assisting stranded motorists on US-27 (now Lansing Road) between Charlotte and Potterville when he was struck and killed by a hit and run drunk driver. Deputy Rice was married and the loving father of two young daughters. The drunk driver was apprehended, convicted and sentenced to prison.

Thank you to all the area law enforcement, fire fighters and emergency personnel that assisted with Shop with a Hero on Tuesday, December 6th! Good time was had by everyone!

SHOPPING SEASON SAFETY

Christmas shopping season is in full swing – don’t let your holiday spirits be ruined by letting your guard down while shopping. Here are some safety tips to remember:

Shopping in Stores
•    Do not buy more than you can carry.  Plan ahead by taking a friend with you or ask a store employee to help you carry your packages to the car.


•    Save all receipts.  Print and save all confirmations from your online purchases.   Start a file folder to keep all receipts together and to help you verify credit card or bank statements as they come in.


•    Consider alternate options to pay for your merchandise, such as onetime or multiuse disposable credit cards or money orders, at online stores and auction sites.


•    Wait until asked before taking out your credit card or checkbook.  An enterprising thief would love to shoulder surf to get your account information.


•    Tell a security guard or store employee if you see an unattended bag or package. 


Walking to and From Your Car
•    Deter pickpockets.  Carry your purse close to your body or your wallet inside a coat or front trouser pocket.


•    Have your keys in hand when approaching your vehicle. Check the back seat and around the car before getting in.


•    Do not leave packages visible in your car windows. Lock them in the trunk or, if possible, take them directly home.Shopping with Small Children
•    If you are shopping with children, make a plan in case you are separated from each other.


o    Select a central meeting place.


o    Teach them to know they can ask mall personnel or store security employees if they need help.Shopping Online
•    Before surfing the Internet, secure your personal computers by updating your security software. Everyone’s computer should have anti-virus, anti-spyware, and anti-spam software, as well as a good firewall installed.


•    Keep your personal information private and your password secure. Do not respond to requests to “verify” your password or credit card information unless you initiated the contact. Legitimate businesses will not contact you in this manner.


•    Beware of “bargains” from companies with whom you are unfamiliar—if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is!


•    Use secure websites for purchases. Look for the icon of a locked padlock at the bottom of the screen or “https” in the URL address.
•    Shop with companies you know and trust. Check for background information if you plan to buy from a new or unfamiliar company.

Yours in Public Safety

Sheriff Tom Reich


November 2, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

30 Alarms 28 Assist   citizens
37 Car/deer   accidents 15 Check   wellbeing’s
8 Domestic   disputes 2 Drug   offenses
25 Shoplifting   complaints 10 Larcenies
3 Malicious   destruction of property 15 Motorist   assists
20 Operating   while impaired 49 Property   damage crashes
8 Personal   Injury crashes 26 Suspicious   Situations
13 Suspicious vehicles 23 Traffic   hazards
145 Traffic   stops 42 Traffic   violations

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 808 calls for service.

The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office received a call from a concerned citizen reporting a phone call from a person with a foreign accent offering for a “donation” the delivery of an absentee ballot. If you receive such a call, please contact 517-543-3510 and make a police report as the Bureau of Elections is tracking these complaints. All voter absentee ballots can be obtained through your local city, village or township clerk.

On Saturday, October 22, 2016 at about 2:59pm, The Eaton County Sheriff Office responded to assist Potterville Police Department with an injury accident at the intersection of Hartel and Vermontville in the city of Potterville. The preliminary investigation indicates a 2012 Honda Civic was eastbound on Vermontville and failed to yield to a 2008 Dodge Caliber traveling northbound on Hartel. The two vehicles impacted in the intersection and then the Civic was pushed over and struck a stopped 2006 Escape. The Dodge was occupied by just the driver while the other two vehicle had 4 people in each vehicle. Potterville Fire Department along with Eaton Area EMS, Benton Township EMS and Windsor EMS responded to evaluate all 9 people including 4 children. Three adults were transported to local hospitals with non-life threatening injuries. The accident remains under investigation by the Potterville Police Department.

the victim, a Lansing resident, was fighting with the suspect, a 32-year-old man from Benton Harbor. The suspect had struck the victim in the head with a liquor bottle and punched the victim numerous times while trying to steal the vehicle. Deputies arrested the suspect and the victim received first aid at the scene.

A dispatched call on 10/23/2016 at approximately 3:00 a.m. was an unknown trouble call involving a man with a gun at Meijer on W. Saginaw in Delta Township. The caller provided the name of the suspect and a description of the Ford pickup truck they were in and that he had returned to the vehicle and ended the call. When Deputies attempted to stop the vehicle, a short vehicle pursuit occurred from Saginaw to Mall Drive West and ended when the suspect fled from the vehicle on foot at an apartment complex on Mall Drive West. Deputies in foot pursuit observed he was holding a handgun to his head and refused to stop or put the weapon down despite numerous verbal requests. At one point, near the wooded area on the west side of Sharp Park, Sprague fired a shot in an unknown direction and shortly after this Deputies lost sight of him. Additional units were requested and responded from the Lansing Police Department, Michigan State Police, Lansing Twp Police, and Ingham County Sheriff’s Office to set up a perimeter and contain the suspect for search teams, which included a K-9 team and a MSP helicopter.

After additional Deputies made contact with the two occupants of the pickup truck, it was reported that as he got back into their pickup truck and then saw the police attempting to stop him, Sprague pointed the handgun at the driver and ordered him to not stop for the police. After fleeing a short distance west on Saginaw and then into the parking lot of the Lansing Mall, stopping briefly when multiple patrol vehicles were behind them then continuing onto Mall Drive West when Sprague order the driver to pull into an apartment complex and let him exit the vehicle.  

It was also learned that the victims of the carjacking were acquaintances of the now deceased suspect, and claimed he had stolen a vehicle from one of them approximately 7 weeks ago. He showed up at their residence and offered to take them to the location he had left their vehicle at. While looking for the vehicle, one of the victims observed that Sprague was also in possession of a handgun equipped with a laser sight. When he asked them to stop at Meijer so he could obtain liquor, they took the opportunity while Sprague was in the store to call 911 to report that Sprague was in possession of a handgun and provided Dispatch with his name and as well as a description of the Ford pickup truck they were in.   The call ended abruptly as he returned to their vehicle.

Following unsuccessful K-9 and Helicopter searches, a large scale search was conducted in neighborhoods between Elmwood and Creyts and Willow and Sharp Park. At approximately 9:00 am, two Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies located Sprague hiding in a shed and observed he was holding the gun to his head. Deputies then took up positions of containment as a negotiator was sent to their location, but Sprague shot himself with the handgun before the negotiator arrived.

David Sprague, the 34-year-old suspect who shot himself after Deputies located him hiding in a backyard shed in Delta Township died in the hospital.

Sheriff Reich said “I wish to express our deep appreciation to the Lansing Police Department, Michigan State Police Aviation Unit and Troopers, Ingham County Sheriff’s Office and the Lansing Twp. Police Department for assisting the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office in a great team effort to protect this community and locate this suspect.”

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS

Daylight Saving Time ends Sunday, Nov. 6, at 2:00 a.m. Be sure to set your clocks back one hour, per the observance that has been in place for the first Sunday in November since 2007.

Parts of Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands do not observe the time change, but, because most of the U.S. and Canada adheres to this observance, the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office along with the Michigan Sheriff’s Association share these safety-check reminders for your family and workplace:

  • Test your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors, ensuring that they work at optimal level year-round. Replace batteries, as needed. Set the time on security alarms, as appropriate, if they are not automatically self-adjusting.

  • Amend lighting

  • Conserve energy. When Daylight Saving Time ends in the fall, people tend to spend more time indoors. So remember to turn off lights when not in use. Consider installing motion or lighting sensors that turn off automatically when no one is around.

  • Practice safe driving and follow traffic rules, particularly since resetting the clock means it gets dark earlier in the evening. Be on extra alert for pedestrians. Know and plan your routes to destinations, especially if they deviate from your normal paths to and from work.

Yours in Public Safety

Sheriff Tom Reich


August 17, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

37 Alarms 26 Assist Citizens
7 Car/deer accidents 15 Check wellbeing’s
16 Domestic disputes 29 Shoplifting complains
25 Larcenies 20 Malicious destruction of property
21 Operating while impaired 11 Personal injury crashes
40 Property damage crashes 26 Suspicious situations
38 Traffic hazards 279 Traffic stops
27 Traffic violations    

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 1020 calls for service.

Eaton County Sheriff Delta Patrol responded to a personal injury crash on August 9th on I96/496 where it was reported that a driver was speeding, lost control, went off the road and struck a tree. Driver was transported to an area hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Eaton County Deputies responded to a driver that drove around the road closed signs on Fairview Road on August 13th and tried to drive over the railroad tracks and the vehicle became stuck. Towing company was called to remove vehicle.

Also on August 13th Eaton County Deputies responded to two motorcycle personal injury crashes. The first occurred on I-69 at Sherwood where a motorcycle went through some gravel and lost control. The driver who was wearing a helmet was thrown into the median and suffered a broken ankle and other injuries. The second crash was on Bellevue Highway where a motorcycle was going around a car in a passing zone and the driver of the car started to turn left. Motorcyclist sustained minor injuries, no helmet was worn.

Head Up, Phone Down When Headed Back to School

With the start of school just days away, Sheriff Reich offers this information from the National Safety Council:

Summertime offers a nice reprieve from the constant shuffling of papers, carpools and heavy backpacks of the school year. But once fall rolls around again, parents and kids have a lot to juggle.

As your children march out the door on that first day of school – and every day – there is really only one priority: Nothing is more important than making sure they get home safely.

A Little History

Back in 1995, children ages 5 to 9 were more at risk than any other age group under 19 for being struck by a vehicle while walking. The good news is, the death rate for kids of all ages in this category declined more than 50 percent in the last 20 years.

But there is much more work to be done. According to a study by SafeKids.org, 61 children are hit by cars every day in the United States, most often during the hours before and after school, and peaking in September. And, there has been a noticeable demographic shift. It is now much more likely a teenager will be hit by a car than his younger counterpart.

Of the 484 pedestrians ages 19 and younger who died after being hit by a motor vehicle in 2013, 47 percent were age 15 to 19, according to Injury Facts 2015. We also know that 16,000 pedestrians 19 and younger were injured in 2013. That's 44 per day.

The injury and death rates for teens has leveled off over the years, but it has not improved significantly.

They Send How Many Texts??

With this knowledge, the National Safety Council is focused on efforts to eliminate distracted walking – specifically walking while texting. According to a study by The Nielsen Company, kids age 13 to 17 send more than 3,400 texts a month. That's seven messages every hour they are awake.

Before your children head out, remind them of these year-round safety tips:

  • Never walk while texting or talking on the phone
  • If texting, move out of the way of others and stop on the sidewalk
  • Never cross the street while using an electronic device
  • Do not walk with headphones on
  • Be aware of the surroundings
  • Always walk on the sidewalk if one is available; if a child must walk on the street, he or she should face oncoming traffic
  • Look left, right, then left again before crossing the street
  • Cross only at crosswalks

Not Only Kids Are Distracted

Drivers have a lot to pay attention to in school zones, too, and there is never an occasion that justifies using a phone while driving. One call or text can change everything.

A study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control revealed that the most common form of travel to school for students age 5 to 14 is the family car. That translates into a lot of cars in school zones at the same time. Eliminating all distractions is key to keeping children safe.

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


June 1, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

38 Alarms 25 Assist Citizens
22 Car/deer accidents 18 Check wellbeing’s
29 Domestic disputes 54 Shoplifting complaints
10 Larcenies 12 Malicious destruction of property
16 Motorist assists 28 Operating while impaired
10 Personal injury crashes 38 Property damage crashes
27 Suspicious situations 35 Traffic hazards
259 Traffic stops 36 Traffic violations

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 1039 calls for service.

The members of the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office offer their condolences to the children, family and friend of former Sheriff Arthur Kelsey. Sheriff Kelsey had proudly served in the United States Navy, was a Trooper with the Michigan State Police and was elected as Sheriff of Eaton County in 1976. Sheriff Kelsey was instrumental in the building of the new Sheriff’s Office and Jail that now sits on Independence Blvd.

Early Friday morning, May 27th Eaton County Deputies responded to a construction area in the Creyts Road area. They found two suspects and were able to apprehend one of the suspects who was a juvenile. Information received shortly after the incident helped to identify and the second suspect also a juvenile was located. Deputies were able to recover some of the stolen property.

Also on May 27th, Eaton County Deputies investigated an IRS Scam by phone and the victim had sent funds. Please remember that the IRS will not contact you by telephone to resolve tax issues.

On Saturday, May 28th, Eaton County Deputies responded to a minor personal injury crash on I69. The driver in the crash reached for something on the floor of the vehicle and drifted into a guard rail. The vehicle spun and caught on fire. The fire was extinguished and the driver was transported to a local hospital.

On Monday, May 30th, Eaton County Deputies responded to a motorcycle/deer accident on Otto Road. The driver had slowed for the railroad tracks when the deer ran into the motorcycle. Injuries were minimal to both.

DOES YOUR CHILD KNOW WHT TO DO IF HE OR SHE FINDS A GUN?

The National Rifle Association of America has developed a program for children called “Eddie the Eagle Gunsafe Program”. The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® program is a gun accident prevention program that seeks to help parents, law enforcement, community groups and educators navigate a topic paramount to our children’s safety. Eddie and his Wing Team are on a mission to help you teach Pre-K through 4th graders what to do if they ever come across a gun.

  1. STOP – This first step is crucial. Stopping first allows the child the time he or she needs to remember the rest of the safety instructions.
  2. DON’T TOUCH- A firearm is not touched or disturbed is unlikely to be fired and otherwise endanger a child or other people.
  3. RUN AWAY-This removes the temptations to touch the firearm as well as the danger that another person may negligently cause it to fire.
  4. TELL A GROWN UP-Children should seek a trustworthy adult, relative, neighbor or teacher if a parent or guardian is not available.

Parents play a key role in developing safe practices and are ultimately responsible for the behavior and safety of their children. Isolated lessons and concepts can quickly be forgotten but with repetition, children remember standard safety procedures. The goal of the program is to help bring up important safety issues with children. To view more information or share a teaching video with a child visit eddieeagle.nra.org

We encourage you as a responsible parent and citizen to reinforce these ideas by repeating this message and discussing it with your child. According to federal statistics, there are guns in approximately 40% of all U.S. households. Even if you do not have a firearm in your home, chances are that someone you know does. Your child could come in contact with a gun at a neighbor's house, when playing with friends, or under other circumstances outside of your control. We encourage you as a responsible parent and citizen today to...

  • Make sure all firearms cannot be reached by anyone who should not have access to them without your consent. Store guns so they are not accessible to unauthorized persons, especially children. 
  • Keep ammunition securely stored where a child or any other unauthorized person cannot reach it. 
  • Talk to your child about guns, and gun safety. By removing the mystery surrounding guns, your child will be far less curious about guns, and more likely to follow safety rules. 
  • Make sure your child understands the difference between a toy gun and a real gun, and the difference between "pretend" and real life. 

In a home where guns are kept, the degree of safety a child has rests squarely on the parents and gun owner. Parents who accept the responsibility to learn, practice and teach gun safety rules will ensure their child's safety to a much greater extent than those who do not. Parental responsibility does not end, however, when the child leaves the home. That is why it is critical for your child to know what to do if he or she encounters a firearm. The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® program has no agenda other than accident prevention -- ensuring that children stay safe should they encounter a gun. 

How Do I Talk to My Child About Guns?

While there is no specific age to talk with your child about gun safety, a good time to introduce the subject is when he or she shows an interest in firearms. The interest can come from family members, friends, toy guns, video games or television shows and movies. Talking openly and honestly about gun safety with your child is usually more effective than just ordering him or her to “Stay out of the gun closet,” and leaving it at that. Such a statement may just stimulate a child’s natural curiosity to investigate further.

Instead talk with them by asking opened ended questions. After having a broad discussion on safety, discuss firearm safety, the rules for firearms and what your child should do when they see a gun in an unsupervised situation. As with any safety lesson, explaining the rules and answering a child’s questions can help remove the mystery surrounding guns. Any rules you set for your own child should also apply to family members and friends who visit the home. This will keep your child from being pressured into showing a gun to visitors.

What are Gun Owners’ Responsibilities?

Most states impose some form of legal duty on adults to take reasonable steps to deny access by children to dangerous substances or instruments. It is the individual gun owner’s responsibility to understand and follow all federal and state laws regarding gun purchase, ownership, storage, transport, etc. Contact your state police and/or local law enforcement agency for information specific to your state.

It is the parent’s responsibility to ensure that guns are stored safely. NRA’s longstanding rule of gun storage is to store your guns so that they are inaccessible to any unauthorized users, especially your children and the children that visit your home. Gun shops sell a wide variety of safes, cases, and other security devices. While specific security measure may vary, a parent must, in every case, assess the exposure of the firearm and absolutely ensure that it is inaccessible to a child.

If you are a firearms owner it is your responsibility to know how to properly hand any firearm you own and also to know how to secure your firearm in a safe manner in your home. The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office has free Childsafe firearm safety kits. Stop by our Records Division to pick them up!

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


May 25, 2016

 Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

 In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

26 Alarms 25 Assist Citizens
25 Car/deer accidents 17 Check wellbeing’s
17 Domestic disputes 22 Shoplifting complaints
17 Larcenies 14 Malicious destruction of property
10 Motorist assists 30 Operating while impaired
7 Personal injury crashes 30 Property damage crashes
26 Suspicious situations 14 Suspicious subjects
30 Traffic hazards 204 Traffic stops

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 888 calls for service.

Bicycle Safe Riding Tips

Before using your bicycle, make sure it is ready to ride. You should always inspect your bike to make sure all parts are secure and working properly.

Remember to:

  • Wear a Properly Fitted Bicycle Helmet. Protect your brain, save your life. For more information see

the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration publication “Easy Steps to Properly Fit a Bicycle Helmet.”

  • Adjust Your Bicycle to Fit. Stand over your bicycle. There should be 1 to 2 inches between you and the

top tube (bar) if using a road bike and 3 to 4 inches if a mountain bicycle. The seat should be level front to

back. The seat height should be adjusted to allow a slight bend at the knee when the leg is fully extended. The

handlebar height should be at the same level with the seat.

  • Check Your Equipment. Before riding, inflate tires properly and check that your brakes work.
  • See and Be Seen. Whether daytime, dawn, dusk, foul weather, or at night, you need to be seen by others.

Wearing white has not been shown to make you more visible. Rather, always wear neon, fluorescent, or other

bright colors when riding day or night. Also wear something that reflects light, such as reflective tape or

markings, or flashing lights. Remember, just because you can see a driver doesn’t mean the driver can see you.

  • Control Your Bicycle. Always ride with at least one hand on the handlebars. Carry books and other items

in a bicycle carrier or backpack.

  • Watch for and Avoid Road Hazards. Be on the lookout for hazards such as potholes, broken glass,

gravel, puddles, leaves, and dogs. All these hazards can cause a crash. If you are riding with friends and you

are in the lead, yell out and point to the hazard to alert the riders behind you.

  • Avoid Riding at Night. It is far more dangerous to ride at night than during the day because you are

harder for others to see. If you have to ride at night, wear something that makes you more easily seen by

others. Make sure you have reflectors on the front and rear of your bicycle (white lights on the front and

red rear reflectors are required by law in many States), in addition to reflectors on your tires, so others

can see you.

Many bicycle-related crashes resulting in injury or death are associated with the bicyclist’s behavior, including such

things as not wearing a bicycle helmet, riding into a street without stopping, turning left or swerving into traffic that

is coming from behind, running a stop sign, and riding the wrong way in traffic. To maximize your safety, always

wear a helmet AND follow the rules of the road.

Rules of the Road – Bicycling on the Road

When riding, always:

  • Go With the Traffic Flow. Ride on the right in the same direction as other vehicles. Go with the flow

– not against it.

  • Obey All Traffic Laws. A bicycle is a vehicle and you’re a driver. When you ride in the street, obey all

traffic signs, signals, and lane markings.

  • Yield to Traffic When Appropriate. Almost always, drivers on a smaller road must yield (wait) for

traffic on a major or larger road. If there is no stop sign or traffic signal and you are coming from a smaller

roadway (out of a driveway, from a sidewalk, a bike path, etc.), you must slow down and look to see if the way

is clear before proceeding. This also means yielding to pedestrians who have already entered a crosswalk.

  • Be Predictable. Ride in a straight line, not in and out of cars. Signal your moves to others.
  • Stay Alert at All Times. Use your eyes AND ears. Watch out for potholes, cracks, wet leaves, storm

grates, railroad tracks, or anything that could make you lose control of your bike. You need your ears to hear

traffic and avoid dangerous situations; don’t wear a headset when you ride.

  • Look Before Turning. When turning left or right, always look behind you for a break in traffic, then

signal before making the turn. Watch for left- or right-turning traffic.

  • Watch for Parked Cars. Ride far enough out from the curb to avoid the unexpected from parked cars

(like doors opening, or cars pulling out).

Sidewalk versus Street Riding

The safest place for bicycle riding is on the street, where bicycles are expected to follow the same rules of the road as

motorists and ride in the same direction.

  • Children less than 10 years old, however, are not mature enough to make the decisions necessary to safely ride

in the street.

  • Children less than 10 years old are better off riding on the sidewalk.

For anyone riding on a sidewalk:

  • Watch for vehicles coming out of or turning into driveways.
  • Stop at corners of sidewalks and streets to look for cars and to make sure the drivers see you before crossing.
  • Enter a street at a corner and not between parked cars. Alert pedestrians that you are near by saying, “Excuse me,” or, “Passing on your left,” or use a bell or horn.

Memorial Day Click It or Ticket Campaign

Reminder: From May 23 to June 5, 2016, the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office will participate in the national Click It or Ticket campaign in an effort to save lives through increased seat belt use. This enforcement period comes ahead of the Memorial Day holiday, one of the busiest travel weekends of the year.

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich



May 11, 2016

 

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

 

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

 

23 Alarms 10 Assaults
13 Assist citizens 5 Breaking and entering
15 Car/deer accidents

16

Check wellbeing’s
21 Domestic disputes 24 Shoplifting complaints
8 Larcenies 12 Motorist assists
28 Operating while impaired 8 Personal injury crashes
37 Property damage crashes 25 Suspicious situations
20 Suspicious subjects 19 Suspicious vehicles
22 Traffic hazards 201 Traffic stops
36 Traffic violations 9 Vacation checks

 

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 897 calls for service.

 

On Thursday, May 5th, Eaton County Deputies conducted a prostitution sting at a local motel with assistance from Lansing Police Department. Six persons were arrested for prostitution and two persons on outstanding warrants.

 

On Saturday, May 7, 2016 at 5:00 p.m., Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to a breaking and entering and malicious destruction of property at the Maple Valley High School on Nashville Hwy in Vermontville. It was reported that doors were propped opened, windows were broken, classrooms had been vandalized and fire extinguishers had been set off. Eaton County Deputies and Detectives worked with school officials and suspects were identified from video. The suspects, both juvenile were located and a warrant request is being reviewed by the Eaton County Prosecuting Attorney.

 

On Sunday, May 8th, Eaton County Deputies investigated a suspicious situation on Benton Road where it was reported that a package fell from the sky and was entangled on a telephone pole. Deputies retrieved the package and discovered it was a project from a pre-engineering Department of a Grand Rapids High School. School officials were contacted and the package was turned over to them.

 

On May 8, 2016 at approximately 11:30 p.m. Eaton County Sheriff Deputies responded to a location on Battle Creek Highway on a domestic violence related incident. When deputies arrived the victims had fled the scene to a safe location. After a long investigation the suspect was arrested and is in custody. Charges are being sought for felony charges of domestic violence with Eaton County Prosecuting Attorney Doug Lloyd. Eaton County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Michigan State Police, Charlotte Police Department and Calhoun County Sheriff’s Office.

 

National Police Week

 

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation which designated May 15 as Peace Officers Memorial Day and the week in which that date falls as Police Week. Currently, tens of thousands of law enforcement officers from around the world converge on Washington, DC to participate in a number of planned events which honor those that have paid the ultimate sacrifice.

 

The Memorial Service began in 1982 as a gathering in Senate Park of approximately 120 survivors and supporters of law enforcement. Decades later, the event, more commonly known as National Police Week, has grown to a series of events which attracts thousands of survivors and law enforcement officers to our Nation's Capital each year.

 

The National Peace Officers' Memorial Service, which is sponsored by the Grand Lodge of the Fraternal Order of Police, is one in a series of events which includes the Candlelight Vigil, which is sponsored by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) and seminars sponsored by Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.)

 

National Police Week draws in between 25,000 to 40,000 attendees. The attendees come from departments throughout the United States as well as from agencies throughout the world. This provides a unique opportunity to meet others who work in law enforcement.

 

Members of the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office participated again in the Unity Tour which raises the awareness of Law Enforcement Officers who have died in the line of duty and to honor their sacrifices. Deputy Cleo Platt, Deputy Dean Foster and Deputy Don Rice all Eaton County Deputies who were killed in the line of duty are being represented by the contingent from the Sheriff’s Office.

 

May 15-21, 2016 is the 42nd annual National EMS Week

 

In 1973, President Gerald Ford authorized EMS Week to celebrate EMS practitioners and the important work they do in our nation's communities. Back then, EMS was a new profession, and EMS practitioners had only just started to be recognized as a critical component of emergency medicine and the public health safety net.

 

A lot has changed since then. EMS is now firmly established as an essential public function and a vital component of the medical care continuum. On any given day, EMS practitioners help save lives by responding to medical emergencies, including heart attack, difficulty breathing, a fall or accident, drowning, cardiac arrest, stroke, drug overdose or acute illness. EMS may provide both basic and advanced medical care at the scene of an emergency and en route to a hospital. EMS practitioners care for their patients' medical needs and show caring and compassion to their patients in their most difficult moments.

 

With the development of mobile integrated healthcare and community paramedicine, EMS is also increasingly a valued participant in achieving the nation's overall healthcare goals of improved patient health and lowered costs.

 

Thank you to all our Emergency Service Personnel in Eaton County for their dedication and devotion to the citizens they serve!

 

Yours in Public Safety,

 

Sheriff Tom Reich


May 4, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

28 Alarms 16 Assist Citizens
11 Car/deer accidents 12 Check wellbeing
23 Domestic disputes

20

Shoplifting complaints
11 Harassments 9 Motorist assists
19 Operating while impaired 35 Property damage crashes
4 Personal injury crashes 25 Suspicious situations
13 Suspicious subjects 16 Suspicious vehicles
20 Traffic hazards 148 Traffic stops
18 Traffic violations 17 Vacation checks

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 750 calls for service.

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation creating “National Correctional Officers’ Week” to take place the first full week on May each year.

National Correctional Officers Week provides a platform allowing the community to recognize our Correctional Officers, both past and present, for the critical and difficult service they provide to the communities they serve.

The Corrections Officers of the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office dedicate themselves to providing exemplary care while maintaining a safe and secure environment for all of the staff and inmates within the Eaton County Jail.  

Please join me to take the time to thank not only the Correction Officers who work at the Eaton County Jail, but Correction Officers everywhere.

Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies have arrested Sharon Davis of Lansing for a November 2015 armed robbery. The offense occurred at the Speedway at Saginaw and Creyts Road in Delta Township.

Davis was arraigned on armed robbery charges and denied bond pending a hearing. Sheriff Reich credits Patrol Deputies along with Detective Rick Buxton for their excellent investigative and evidence handling procedures that have been instrumental.

As in all arrests, Davis is innocent until proven guilty.

On Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at 7:39am the Eaton County Sheriff's Office and the Michigan State Police Motor Carrier Division responded to a personal injury accident on M-43 just east of M-50 in Sunfield Township.

A 2001 Oldsmobile Alero was traveling westbound on M-43 and appears to have crossed the center line striking an eastbound semi truck driven by a 27 year old male from Illinois.

The driver of the semi was not injured. The driver of the Alero was a 20 year old Sunfield man. He was treated on scene by Eaton Area EMS and then transported by Aeromed to a hospital in Grand Rapids. The driver is being treated for potential life threatening injuries.

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY AWARENESSMONTH 2016

Mayis MotorcycleSafetyAwareness Month, designed toencourage all drivers and motorcyclists to sharethe road”with each other.In 2014, 4,586 motorcyclists werekilled in trafficcrashes, adecreaseof2.3 percent from 2013 (4,692). Thosedeaths account for14 percent ofthetotal highwayfatalities thatyear. This decreasein motorcyclefatalities continues to break atragictrend overthelast 17years, which saw onlyoneotherdeclinein 2009.Injured motorcyclists also decreased from 93,000 in 2013to 88,000 in 2014.

Safe ridingpractices andcooperation from all roadusers will help reducethenumberoffatalities and injuries on ournations highways. But its especiallyimportant formotorists to understand thesafetychallenges faced bymotorcyclists suchas size and visibility, andmotorcycle riding practices likedownshiftingandweavingto knowhow to anticipate and respond to them. By raisingmotorists’ awareness, both drivers and riders will besafersharingthe road.

TIPSFORMOTORISTS

Researchand state-leveldatahas andcontinues to consistentlyidentifymotorists as being at-fault in overhalfof allmulti-vehiclemotorcycle-involved collisions.

NHTSA-fundedresearchhas shown that peoplebehind thewheels ofpassengervehicles aredistracted morethan50 percent ofthetime. Road users should neverdrive, bike, or walk whiledistracted. Doingso can result in tragic consequences for all onthe road, includingmotorcyclists.

It mayseem inconsequential, but theimproperuseofavehicle’s rear-viewand side- view mirrors contributesto collisions, particularlywith smallervehicles likemotorcycles. With roughly40 percent ofavehicles outerperimeterzones hidden byblind spots, improper adjustment orlack ofuseofone’s side-view mirrors can havedire

consequences formotorcyclists.

Ifyou areturningat an intersection, andyourviewofoncomingtrafficis partially obstructed, wait untilyoucan seearound theobstruction, sufficientlyscan for all roadwayusers (pedestrians and motorcyclists included), and proceed with caution. Slow yourdecision-makingprocess down at intersections.

One’s reaction time andabilityto assess and respond to apotential collision, such as a lane change, is significantlyhindered iftherearelargedifferences in speedamong vehicles in traffic. Whenapproaching a congestedroadway, beingdiligentin modifying yourspeed to match that of the cars in traffic can be alifesaver, particularlyfor motorcyclists.

Allow a motorcyclist a full lane width. Though it may seem as if there is enough room in a singlelane for a motor vehicle and a motorcycle, looks can be deceiving.Share the road, but not the lane: a motorcyclist needs room to maneuver safely.


Because motorcycles are smaller than most vehicles, they can be difficult to see. Their size can also cause other drivers to misjudge their speed and distance.

Size also counts against motorcycles when it comes to blind spots. Motorcyclists can be easily hidden in a vehicles blind spot. Always look for motorcycles by checking your mirrors and blind spots before switching to another lane of traffic.

Always signal your intentions before changing lanes or merging with traffic. This allows motorcyclists to anticipate your movement and find a safe lane position.

Dont be fooled bya flashing turn signal on amotorcycle—it may not be self-canceling and the motorcyclist may have forgotten to turn itoff. Wait to be sure the rideris going to turn before you proceed.

Allow more follow distance– three or four seconds – when following a motorcycle; this gives the motorcycle rider more time to maneuver or stop in an emergency.Motorcycle riders may suddenly need to change speed or adjust lane position to avoid hazards such as potholes, gravel, wet or slippery surfaces, pavement seams, railroad crossings, and grooved pavement.

FACTSABOUTHELMETUSE

The use of DOT-compliant motorcycle helmets increased to 64 percent in 2015,up from 60 percent in 2014,based on the National Occupant Protection Use Survey(NOPUS).

Helmet use among motorcyclists on expressways increased significantly to 81 percent, up from 64 percent in 2013.

Helmet use among motorcyclists in the southern states increased significantly to 78 percent, upfrom 65 percent in 2014.

Useofnon-compliant motorcycle helmets decreased significantlyto 5 percent, from 7 percent in 2014.

In 2014, 41 percent offatallyinjured motorcycle riders and 53 percent of fatallyinjured motorcyclepassengers werenot wearinghelmetsat thetimeofthe crash.

FACTSABOUTMOTORCYCLESAND ALCOHOL

The percentage of motorcycle riders who were intoxicated in fatal crashes (27%)was greater than the percentage of intoxicated drivers of passenger cars (23%)and light trucks (21%)in fatal crashes in 2014.

In 2013, 29 percent of all fatally injured motorcycle riders had BAC levels of.08 or higher.

Motorcycle riders killed in traffic crashes at night were over 3 times (3.2)more likely to have BAC levels of.08g/dLor higher than those killed during the day(45% and 14%, respectively).

    • 43% of the 2,030 motorcycle riders who died in single-vehicle crashes in 2013 had BAClevels of.08 g/dl or higher. Sixty-four percent of those killed in single- vehicle crashes on weekend nights hadBACs of.08 g/dl orhigher.

TIPSFORMOTORCYCLISTS

WearaDOT-complianthelmet and usereflectivetape andgearto bemorevisible.

NHTSA estimates helmets saved thelives of1,630 motorcyclists in 2014.

Never ride while impaired or distracted—it is not worth the risk ofkilling or injuring yourself or someone else.Plus, a DUI costs $10,000 on average, andcan lead to jail time, loss of your driver’s license, and higher insurance rates.


April 27, 2016

 

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

 

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

 

30 Alarms 17 Assist Citizens
15 Car/deer accidents 7 Breaking and entering
15 Domestic disputes

50

Shoplifting complaints
15 Larcenies 10 Motorist assists
16 Operating while impaired 22 Property damage crashes
23 Suspicious situations 12 Suspicious vehicles
33 Traffic hazards 255 Traffic stops
21 Traffic violations 21 Vacation checks

 

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 897 calls for service.

 

On Tuesday 04/19/16, at approximately 10:00 p.m., Eaton County Sheriff’s Office deputies were dispatched to a three car rollover crash on Waverly Rd near Old Lansing Road. Deputies arrived and found one person had been ejected from one of the vehicles.

 

Preliminary investigations show a vehicle was northbound on Waverly Rd and swerved to miss a bicyclist in the road causing it to strike a southbound vehicle head on. A third vehicle then rear-ended the southbound car that was struck head on.  

 

Patients were transported to Sparrow Hospital and their condition is unknown at this time. Alcohol is not believed to be a factor in the crash.

 

On April 24th, 2016 at approximately 9:00pm, the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office was dispatched to the Sherwood Forest Campground in Walton Township for a missing 13 year old person with a cognitive impairment.  Eaton County Sheriff Deputy Aaron Campbell and his K9 partner (Cash) responded to assist in the search and were able to locate the missing person in a wooded area.  The 13 year old was found as the Michigan State Police Aviation unit was preparing to assist in the search. The missing person had not suffered any injuries and was reunited with his parents.

 

Eaton County Deputies have investigated two complaints of home invasion on Griffin Highway in Walton Township during the past week. Tools and lawn equipment were taken.

 

Eaton County Deputies responded to a home invasion on Brown Road in Sunfield Township where a boat motor was taken from a garage on Monday, April 25th.

 

May 1st – Keep Kids Alive Drive 25 Awareness Day

 

The following information is shared from our friends at Neighborhood Traffic Safety. With the warm weather approaching more children will be out enjoying the sunshine. As drivers we have a responsibility to stay alert and aware.

 

We hear the word “Accident” often. Anytime a crash occurs or child is hit by a car we hear it referred to as an accident.

 

Yet how many tragedies are accidents? If a driver is exceeding the speed limit on a neighborhood street, or any roadway for that matter, and hits a child crossing the street, running after a ball, or riding a bike, is that an accident?

 

Consider these facts from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration:

 

          Most speeders on local roadways live right in the neighborhood.

 

          If you hit a pedestrian:

 

            At 20 mph 5% will die

 

            At 30 mph 45% will die

 

            At 40 mph 85% will die

 

          Pedestrian fatalities increase by 3 times when moving from 25 mph zones to 30 mph zones.

 

          Local roadways, including residential streets, have a fatality rate per miles driven over 2 times higher than on highways.

 

Clearly, driver behavior is crucial to creating a safe environment for everyone using a roadway. Controlling speed is no accident. It is a responsibility that helps to insure safety for others and for ourselves. No one wants to be behind the wheel and hit a child, or pedestrian of any age for that matter. Safe driving behavior is no accident. It is a decision we make each time we get behind the wheel.

 

The national non-profit Keep Kids Alive Drive 25® is committed to working with communities to involve and educate residents about how to make neighborhood streets safer. This includes children playing, bike riders, pedestrians of all ages, drivers, and passengers. It takes the commitment of parents, law enforcement, city services, schools, businesses, and city government working together to create safe streets for the benefit of all. Creating safe neighborhood streets is no accident.

 

Keep Kids Alive Drive 25 began in August 1998 in Omaha, Nebraska. Since that time the campaign has grown to encompass initiatives in over 1,400 communities representing 49 states plus Washington DC, 2 Canadian Provinces, the Bahamas, and Queensland State, Australia.

 

Along the way many families have become involved in the effort in memory of their own children, hit and killed on neighborhood streets, often by a speeding or inattentive driver. Some of these have worked on legislation to help create safer neighborhood roadways. These include Barbara Foster of Mesquite, Texas, whose son, Kyle, was hit and killed while crossing the street on Halloween of 2003. House Bill 87, signed into law in 2005, made it easy for Texas municipalities to lower residential speeds from 30 mph to 25 mph by taking away the need to do extensive, and expensive, engineering studies to justify lower speed limits to protect pedestrians, cyclists, drivers, and their passengers.

 

Sean Martin initiated a local ordinance in Miami Lakes, Florida to reduce the speed limit entering into school zones. This is the “Shaye Martin Keep Kids Alive” law created in memory of his 8 year-old son who was hit and killed by a speeding motorist (60+ mph) in a school zone while he was walking on a sidewalk.

 

However, the intent of Keep Kids Alive Drive 25 is to be proactive in our efforts. It should not take the death of a child to wake us up to the opportunity to make a difference today.

 

Cities have joined the cause by establishing Traffic Safety Committees that bring together residents, law enforcement, public works and city officials, schools, businesses, and civic groups to develop plans to implement Keep Kids Alive Drive 25 community-wide. Educational actions include expecting parents to monitor their children and establish safe places to play. The street is not a playground. It means teaching children how to cross the street correctly and safely. It means buckling up for each and every trip no matter the distance. It means observing the speed limit and slowing down when we see children ahead, or when visibility is poor. It means paying attention to potential hazards such as a parked car a child could be hiding behind. These are all quality of life concerns that we ourselves have the power to address. Neighborhood traffic safety is no accident.

 

When communities mobilize they see results. The City of Oceanside, California saw a 16% decrease in average neighborhood speed upon implementing Keep Kids Alive Drive 25. The City of Oro Valley, Arizona realized a 13.5% decrease when they placed Keep Kids Alive Drive 25® decals on every residential trash can for curbside pick-up. On average drivers were moving at average speeds of below 25 mph. That’s no accident. These results lead to the establishment of “America’s Trash Talks to Keep Kids Alive” which is spreading to communities throughout the U.S.

 

Remember to:

 

  • Walk around your vehicle before every trip to make sure children are not in harm’s way.
  • Set aside the cell phone and any other distracting objects so the sole focus is on driving.
  • Buckle up everyone – it’s the law!
  • At a stop sign take time to make sure no one is in the walk way
  • Observe all speed limits and slow down accordingly when children, pedestrians or cyclists are present.
  • Create space between you and the vehicle in front of you.
  • Use your blinkers
  • Don’t drink and drive!

 

Learn more about how your neighborhood, community, school, business, or civic organization can make a difference in creating safe streets for all. Visit www.KeepKidsAliveDrive25.org, e-mail kkad25@kkad25.org, or call 402-334-1391.


April 20, 2016

 Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

31 Alarms 21 Assist Citizens
6 Assaults 3 Breaking and entering
9 Car/deer accidents

8

Car in the ditch
10 Domestic disputes 25 Shoplifting complains
14 Larcenies 11 Loud noise complaints
15 Operating while impaired 11 Personal injury crashes
27 Property damage crashes 24 Suspicious situation
13 Suspicious subject 22 Traffic hazards
265 Traffic stops 36 Traffic violations

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 913 calls for service.

On Thursday, April 14th Eaton County Deputies Delta Patrol assisted Delta Fire Department with evacuation of an apartment building on Dibble St.

On Friday, April 15th Eaton County Deputies responded to a semi truck that had caught on fire on I-69.

On Saturday, April 16th Eaton County Deputies responded to a one vehicle personal injury crash on I-69 at Ainger Road. The driver reported that he started to fall asleep, drove off the road, woke up and over-corrected causing his pickup truck to roll. There were no serious injuries and I-69 was closed for over an hour.

Also on April 16th Eaton County Deputies responded to a personal injury crash on Hartel Road at St. Joe Hwy. No one was injured.

On Saturday, Eaton County Deputies assisted Charlotte EMS on a call where the victim was on a walk, began having medical issues and deputies were able to locate her a mile off road.

On Sunday, April 17th, Eaton County Deputies Delta Patrol were called to an apartment building on a check well being and found a one year old and five year old who were left home alone by the sitter. Eaton County Deputies obtained kids meals for the children until the parent could be located.

RAIL SAFETY WEEK – APRIL 25-MAY 1

In Eaton County there are 73 railroad crossings.   Did you know that trespassing on railway tracks and property is the leading cause of rail-related deaths and is illegal? The following information is shared by CN Railway:

  1. Don’t be fooled – because of their size trains appear to be much further away and traveling much slower than their actual speed.
  2. Trains can sometimes travel rapidly. The average train needs at least 1.25 miles to stop. Trains can stop – but that can’t stop quickly!
  3. Taking a shortcut across the tracks or being on railway property is illegal and trespassers can get seriously injured or killed.
  4. The average freight train weighs over 12 million pounds – compared to a car which weighs about 3,000 pounds. A train hitting a car is like a car hitting a pop can.
  5. Stopped railway cars can move at any time. If you’re on one or near one when it moves, you could lose a limb or worse, your life.
  6. If you are trespassing on a bridge with a train approaching you have two choices, jump or get hit. Tunnels, bridges and trestles are only designed for trains.
  7. Trains can carry loads that are wider than the railroad cars themselves. They can have chains, straps or other equipment that may extend outside the car.   If you are standing too close, you could get hit.
  8. Trains do not always run on a schedule. They can run at any time, on any track and come from either direction.

Get involved – act now!

  1. Say something! If you witness any unsafe situation near the railroad call the CN Police at 1-800-465-9239.
  2. Act as a role model around trains and tracks.   Discuss rail safety with your children and explain the dangers of playing on or near the tracks.
  3. To organize a safety presentation in our local school email cnsafety@cn.ca
 
 


March 30, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

24 Alarms 21 Assist Citizens
6 Assaults 5 Breaking and entering
17 Car/deer accidents

11

Check wellbeing’s
12 Civil complaints 10 Disorderly persons
29 Domestic disputes 6 Drug offenses
49 Shoplifting

13

Harassment complaints
14 Larcenies 17 Operating while impaired
4 Personal injury crashes 39 Property damage crashes
8 Suicidal threats 32 Suspicious situations
22 Suspicious vehicles 37 Traffic hazards
227 Traffic stops 29 Traffic violations
26 Vacation checks 13 Warrant pickups

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 937 calls for service.

There are still opening in the Spring Citizen Police Academy. For information or an application call 517-543-5019 or email todell@eatoncounty.org

On 3/24/2016 at approximately 1:00 a.m., Eaton County Deputies from the Delta Township Division were dispatched to 4820 S. Waverly Rd. for a report of a stabbing.  During the investigation it was discovered that a 21 year old female from Lansing had been stabbed in the upper torso.  The suspect is described as a black or African American female of average height and weight, approximately 18-20 years old with a tattoo on the cheek bone area of her face.  The suspect fled the area prior to police arriving on scene.  The victim is being treated at a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries. The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office is asking for anyone who may have witnessed the assault or knows the identity of the suspect to contact Detective Burton at the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office, Delta Township Substation, at (517) 323-8480

On 03-25-16 at approximately 10:40 p.m., an Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputy working a special OWI enforcement assignment observed a vehicle on Waverly Rd. near Sandhurst Dr. which was weaving in and out of its lane as well as speeding up and slowing down. The Deputy believed the driver might be intoxicated and attempted a traffic stop. The driver turned on to a side street and appeared to be stopping but then accelerated away from the Deputy.  The vehicle travelled approximately 4-5 blocks when it left the roadway and struck a house in the 2600 Blk of S. Deerfield St. causing significant damage to the residence.

The two occupants inside the house were not injured.

The male driver of the vehicle, a 29 year old Lansing resident, was transported to the hospital with non life threatening injuries and was admitted. The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office will be seeking charges of Operating While Intoxicated 2ndOffense, Fleeing and Eluding, and Driving While License Suspended.

APRIL 2ND – NATIONAL LOVE OUR CHILDREN DAY

As part of National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, the first Saturday of April is designated as Love Our Children Day. This national campaign is an effort to break the cycle of violence against children. From the loveourchildrenusa.org website, Sheriff Reich offers this information:

Recognize The Signs Of
Violence and Neglect Against Children

These signs might mean a child is a victim of violence and neglect:

The Child

Has had many unusual injuries or injuries that can't be explained
Seems sad and cries a lot
Fights with classmates, acts out in the classroom, or destroys things; throws toys across a room or is violent toward a pet
Seems very tired; talks about trouble sleeping and often has nightmares
Seems afraid of a parent or other adults, like teachers or baby-sitters
Spends a lot of time at the playground and doesn't want to go home after school, as if afraid of something there

The Child's Parents

Stay away from other mothers and fathers in the neighborhood, do not take part in school activities, and may have a drinking or drug abuse problem
Don't want to talk about the child's injuries or seem nervous when they do

Parents who were victims of violence and neglect as children,
can often continue the cycle when they punish their own children.

Being poor, sick or on drugs, increases the risk of harming and neglecting a child.

If you suspect that a child you know is being harmed and neglected- perhaps a niece or a nephew, a child in the neighborhood or at school - you need to do something about it.

Use common sense in trying to figure out if a child is being harmed or neglected. For example, normal, active children get some bruises and bumps from everyday playing. These bruises are mostly over bony areas such as knees, elbows, and shins. But -- if you see a child with injuries on other parts of their body, such as their stomach, cheeks, ears, buttocks, mouth, or thighs, you should think twice. Black eyes, human bite marks, and round burns the size of a cigarette, don't come from everyday play!

Not all child abuse is physical. Emotional abuse is one of the most common and harmful forms of child abuse. Making fun of a child, name calling, always finding fault, and showing no respect can damage a child's self-esteem forever! When emotional abuse occurs often, and over a long period of time, it can have a lifelong impact -- affecting a child's happiness, relationships and success.

The Child

May find it hard to make friends
Can avoid doing things with other children
Can avoid being in places where they’re expected to be loving
May tend to be pushy and hostile
Might have a hard time learning, be overly active, or have problems such as bed-wetting or soiling
Might act falsely grown up, having to care for adults or others far beyond what should be expected for the child's age
May become gloomy and depressed, unable to enjoy his or her self. They might do things that work against themselves.
Could become self-destructive, self injuring, or even attempting suicide.

As with other types of harm and neglect, parents who were emotionally abused are more likely to emotionally abuse their own kids. To stop the abuse, they need to become aware of how they’re treating their children. Often they don’t know how damaging their behavior is. If they did, and knew how much it hurt their children, they would likely want to stop it. However, they may not be able to stop without help from a professional.

In most child abuse cases, parents don’t want to hurt their children. Most abuse occurs when adults have a hard time controlling their anger. Even if they don't mean to, a parent who abuses a child could do it again, especially if their anger and stresses are not managed. They may need help from an outside group, such as a church, parenting education center, or local Parents Anonymous chapter.

If you have abused your child or feel that you might --- talk with a trusted friend, doctor, or clergyman. Don’t be afraid – you need help! They can refer you to someone who can help you.

Many community groups and churches offer parenting classes that can help you learn how to talk to your child and manage your problems.

 
 
 

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


March 23, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

28 Alarms 19 Assist Citizens
3 Assaults 6 Breaking and entering
19 Car/deer accidents

13

Check wellbeing’s
21 Civil complaints 10 Disorderly persons
26 Domestic disputes 21 Shoplifting
19 Larcenies

11

Malicious destruction of property
14 Motorist assists 14 Operating while impaired
13 Personal injury crashes 42 Property damage crashes
5 Suicidal threats 19 Suspicious situations
18 Suspicious vehicles 41 Traffic hazards
355 Traffic stops 26 Traffic violations
29 Vacation checks 11 Unwanted subjects

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 1063 calls for service.

There are still opening in the Spring Citizen Police Academy. For information or an application call 517-543-5019 or email todell@eatoncounty.org

On Friday, March 18th, Eaton County Deputies responded to a vehicle that had crashed into a house on Petrieville Highway. The driver of the vehicle was intoxicated and was transported to the hospital for injuries.

On Saturday, March 19th, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office assisted with the Department of Agriculture with a check of every gas pump in Eaton County for possible credit card skimmers. We are happy to report that no skimmers were found in Eaton County!

On Sunday, March 20th, Eaton County Deputies of the Delta Patrol investigated two businesses that had rocks thrown through the windows. One business was entered by the suspect(s) and took a cash drawer. Case is still under investigation

HOME REPAIR SCAMS

It’s a common scam that's repeated every spring and summer; construction crews go door-to-door claiming that they have leftover supplies from another job, need to get rid of them, and can perform work very cheap. Their prices seem too good to be true—because they are.   

The repair work often costs more than the original estimates, the job is completed very quickly, and the quality is very poor. The crew then leaves before the homeowner notices the poor quality.

One of the most common scams is for asphalt resurfacing, in which only a thin layer of asphalt is applied—if the material is even asphalt at all—and the scammers quickly collect their money and leave, while the asphalt begins to crack days later.

Another scam takes the form of house painting, in which the scammer uses a cheap paint that begins to deteriorate after a heavy rain.

Other forms of fraud include stopping halfway through a job, requesting payment and then never finishing. Victims report scammers started work on their home after only being given an estimate, with the homeowner never giving permission or agreeing to the deal. The scammer will then demand payment for the entire job, saying the homeowner is breaking the law by not paying. 

Eaton County Sheriff Tom Reich reminds homeowners that there are warning signs to look for if you think any contractor is illegitimate:

• The repairperson drives an unmarked truck or van with an out-of-state license.

• The worker has no business identification, local address, or telephone number.

• You are offered a "special price" if you sign today.

• The worker wants upfront cost or fees, or accepts only cash.

• No written estimates or contracts are provided.

• The worker does not have any references.

• The offer sounds "too good to be true"

• The worker cannot provide any contractor's license, permits, insurance, or bonding information.

Anyone who witnesses or has any information on these types of scams is encouraged to call the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office at 517-543-3512

 
 
 

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


March 16, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

23 Alarms 20 Assist Citizens
3 Breaking and entering 15 Car/deer accidents
16 Check well beings

17

Domestic disputes
5 Drug offenses 40 Shoplifting
10 Malicious destruction of property 19 Motorist assists
17 Operating while impaired

3

Personal injury crashes
21 Property damage crashes 17 Suspicious situations
21 Suspicious vehicles 19 Traffic hazards
313 Traffic stops 23 Traffic violations
29 Vacation checks 7 Warrant pickups

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 989 calls for service.

There are still opening in the Spring Citizen Police Academy. For information or an application call 517-543-5019 or email todell@eatoncounty.org

On Friday March 11th, Eaton County Deputies assisted Charlotte Police with a subject that was running. An Eaton County Deputy was able to stop the suspect.

Eaton County Deputies are investigating a breaking and entering on E. Butterfield Highway that occurred on Friday, March 11th.

Eaton County Deputies responded to a call regarding subjects entering cars at Ramblewood Apartments in Delta Township. Deputies were able to locate and detain two adults and one juvenile.

Eaton County Deputies are investigating a home invasion on Delta River Drive that occurred between March 10 and March 13th.

On Monday, March 14 2016, the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office Delta Patrol responded to a call at Grand Woods Park in Delta Township.  The call was that a dog had become trapped in a fox hole.  The owner could hear the dog crying from inside the hole.  The dog was a 7 year old female Jack Russell Terrier named “Frances”.  Deputies arrived and summoned help from the Delta Township Fire Department.  Deputies, fire personnel and neighbors began hand digging to find the dog that was trapped numerous feet into this hole.  Deputies summoned Michigan Plumbing who brought a pipe camera to the scene.  The camera allowed them to see the dog was trapped in the hole and could not turn around.  As they continued to dig, the hole began to collapse and the dog’s cries went silent.  The owner was preparing for the worst.  At this time a Delta Township Firefighter reached further into the hole and grabbed a hold of an opossum. He quickly released that back to the wild.  He then reached back into the hole and was able to grab Frances and return her to her owner. The whole process took around 3 hours.  The owner could not be more grateful for the caring nature of the firefighters and deputies who continued to work to for hours in the dark to rescue Frances.

Frances is resting at home with her owner today.  We would like to thank everyone who helped save this dog.  Thank you to Michigan Plumbing and all the neighbors who came out to help.  A special thank you to the Delta Township firefighter who reached his arm into the hole and recovered not only the opossum, but Frances as well.

THE UNFORTUNATE SIGNS OF SPRING

Robins are back, sap has been boiled into syrup, and trees are budding – all great signs of spring. One unfortunate sign of spring is the discarded dangerous chemicals, cooking equipment and other components used in the manufacturing of methamphetamine.

The chemicals and components used to cook methamphetamine are extremely toxic and hazardous. Accidental exposure to discarded methamphetamine chemicals and equipment can cause serious health injuries including burns, collapsed lungs and nerve damage.

While doing yard clean up and if there are discarded containers, jars, cans or boxes of:

  • Plastic bottles with granular material inside
  • Heet or rubbing alcohol
  • Acetone
  • Propane tanks with blue or discolored values
  • Cold/allergy tablet packages
  • Disassembled lithium batteries
  • Brake cleaner
  • Camping fuel
  • Stained or crushed cookware
  • Red Devil Lye or drain cleaner
  • Reddish stained coffee filters or rags
  • Ether cans-Starting fluid
  • Plastic hoses
  • Rubber tubing
  • Glass ware

Do not handle, move or smell the items and contact your local law enforcement agency at 911

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich

 


March 9, 2016

 

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

20 Alarms 18 Assist Citizens
11 Car/deer accidents 45 Cars in the ditch
18 Check well beings

18

Domestic disputes
8 Drug offenses 30 Shoplifting
32 Motorist assists 20 Operating while impaired
10 Personal injury crashes

45

Property damage crashes
16 Suspicious situations 48 Traffic hazards
208 Traffic stops 18 Traffic violations
35 Vacation checks 10 Warrant pickup attempts

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 908 calls for service.

On Friday, March 4th, Eaton County Deputies responded to a car/school bus crash on Marshall Road near Olivet. A car rear ended a school bus. No injuries to anyone on the bus or in the car.

Also on Friday, March 4th a car hauler traveling on 496 struck the over pass at Snow Road. Eaton County Deputies responded as debris from one of the vehicles scattered the roadway.

TALK TO YOUR CHILD ABOUT GUN SAFETY

Parents play a key role in developing safe practices and are ultimately responsible for the safety of their children. Lessons and concepts can quickly be forgotten but with repetition, children remember standard safety procedures. The following information is from the Eddie the Eagle Gun Safe Program and is designed to help you bring up an important safety issues with your child.

If children see a gun they need to remember – Stop, Don’t Touch, Run Away and Tell a Grown Up:

STOP:

Stopping first allows the child the time he or she needs to remember the safety instructions.

DON’T TOUCH:

A firearm that is not touched or disturbed is unlikely to fire and otherwise endanger your child or other people.

RUN FOR HELP:

This removes the temptation to touch the firearm as well as the danger that another person may negligently cause it to fire.

TELL A GROWN UP:

Children need to immediately tell their parent or if the parent is not available a trustworthy adult, neighbor, relative or teacher.

Reinforce these ideas by reviewing and discussing them often with the child.   Even if you do not have a firearm in the home, chances are someone you know does. The child could come in contact with a gun at a neighbor’s house, when playing with friends or under other circumstances outside of parental control.

  • ·Make sure all firearms cannot be reached by anyone who should not have access to them without your consent.   Store guns so they are not accessible to unauthorized persons – ESPECIALLY CHILDREN!
  • ·Unloaded firearms can be secured with a gun locking device that makes the firearm inoperable.   Free firearm safety kits are available at the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office in Charlotte at the Records Department.
  • ·Keep ammunition securely stored where a child or any other unauthorized person cannot reach it.
  • ·Talk to your child about guns and gun safety often. By removing the mystery about guns the child will be far less curious about guns and more likely to follow safety rules.

In a home where guns are kept the degree of safety a child has is the responsibility of the parents and gun owner. Parent’s who learn, practice and teach gun safety rules will ensure the child’s safety.

Discuss the difference between play guns and real guns, pretend and real life. Children often see characters shot and “killed” with well-documented frequency on TV and in movies. When that child sees the same actor appear in next week’s episode, or another movie or TV show, confusion between entertainment and real life may result. In many video games, players actively shoot other characters with no personal consequences. The player can simply hit the reset button to bring themselves and other characters back to life. Do not assume that your child knows the difference between being “killed” on TV or in a video game and the reality of gun violence.

     Having toy guns in the house is a decision each parent should make. If your child has toy guns, you may want to use them to explain how they differ from genuine firearms. Make sure to tell them to never assume a gun they see or find is a toy.

Talk to your child about guns. While there is no specific age to talk with your child about gun safety, a good time to introduce the subject is when he or she shows an interest in firearms. The interest can come from family members, friends, toy guns, video games or television shows and movies. Talking openly and honestly about gun safety with your child is usually more effective than just ordering him or her to “Stay out of the gun closet,” and leaving it at that. Such a statement may just stimulate a child’s natural curiosity to investigate further.

Instead talk with them by asking opened ended questions. After having a broad discussion on safety, discuss firearm safety, the rules for firearms and what your child should do when they see a gun in an unsupervised situation. As with any safety lesson, explaining the rules and answering a child’s questions can help remove the mystery surrounding guns. Any rules you set for your own child should also apply to family members and friends who visit the home. This will keep your child from being pressured into showing a gun to visitors.

 


March 2, 2016

 

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

 

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

 

30 Alarms 24 Assist Citizens
21 Car/deer accidents 45 Cars in the ditch
10 Domestic dispute

9

Drug offenses
15 Shoplifting 19 Larcenies
23 Motorist assists 10 Operating while impaired
11 Parking violations

61

Property damage crashes
6 Personal injury crashes 22 Suspicious situations
49 Traffic hazards 237 Traffic stops
29 Vacation checks 10 Warrant pickup attempts

 

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 949 calls for service.

 

Do1thing for March

 

 

In a disaster you may be asked to either evacuate or shelter-in-place. In the excitement of an emergency, it can be difficult to focus on what you are doing. Know what to do to keep your family safe. Practice your tornado and fire safety plans. If your family has practiced, they will be more comfortable doing it when the emergency actually happens.

Identify the best storm shelter in your home and practice getting to the shelter with your family.

Choosing the best place in your home or workplace to shelter from a tornado isn’t always easy. Many newer buildings don’t have a really good shelter area. Use these rules of thumb to find the best tornado shelter possible:

• Stay away from windows and skylights
• Shelter “down and in” - Put as many walls between yourself and the outside as you can (think of the ceiling as a wall)
• Avoid rooms with large ceiling expanses
• Find an area large enough for everyone to stay comfortably for at least 45 minutes

Learn how to safely shelter in place.

In an emergency like a chemical spill, you may be told to “shelter in place”. This means to make the place where you are a safe place to stay until the danger has passed. Shelter in place orders are given when it would be dangerous for you to go outside.

Notification - Warning sirens may be used to warn people that it is not safe to be outside. Emergency responders may go door to door in the affected area. They may also use loudspeakers from police or fire vehicles to give instructions. Information will also be given over television and radio using the Emergency Alert System.

What to do in a hazardous materials incident

The first thing to do when a chemical spill or similar event occurs is to get information. Turn on the television or radio to find out if your area is affected and what steps to take. Never call 911 to get information about an emergency. Only call 911 if you are injured or need assistance.

If you are told to shelter in place you should close all doors and windows and shut off fans and air conditioners. Take your family to a room with as few doors and windows as possible. You may be told to put towels or tape around the cracks of the windows and doors. Follow emergency instructions carefully. Make sure you take a battery-powered radio with you so that you will know when the danger has passed. Power in your area may be shut off during the incident.
 Make a Go Bag for emergency sheltering.

Emergency shelters will be opened when people are displaced from their homes. In most areas emergency shelters are operated by the American Red Cross. At the Red Cross Shelter:

Red Cross will provide 

• A cot to sleep on
• Meals and bottled water
• A nurse for basic medical care
• Information about the disaster from public officials

You may need to bring 

• Pillow and blanket
• Your own medication and medical supplies (or a list of what you are taking, dosage, and Dr’s names)
• Identification
• Change of clothes
• Cards or magazines
• Comfort items

Not allowed at the shelter

• Weapons or alcohol
• Pets (except for service animals)

For more information about small steps toward being prepared for an emergency visit do1thing.com.

 

Yours in Public Safety,

 

Sheriff Tom Reich


February 24, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

44 Alarms 23 Assist Citizens
21 Car/deer accidents 13 Check well being
23 Domestic dispute

23

Shoplifting
13 Motorist assist 10 Operating while impaired
11 Personal injury crash 34 Property damage crash
8 Suicidal threats

23

Suspicious situations
12 Suspicious subjects 18 Suspicious vehicles
57 Traffic hazards 204 Traffic stops
41 Vacation checks 11 Warrant pickup attempts

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 921 calls for service.

Tuesday February 16th around 0551 hrs, the Eaton County Sheriff's Office Delta Patrol responded to a semi rollover accident on Nixon and Davis Rds. The investigation revealed that the driver missed his turn to the GM LDT Plant and was attempting to turn around when the accident occurred. As the driver was attempting to turn around he backed into a very deep ditch causing the truck and trailer to tip over. The driver had minor injuries and was transported to a local hospital. There were no other vehicles involved in the accident.

Eaton County Deputies are looking for a 1997 Green Ford Explorer with front end damage that was involved in a hit and run crash at Creyts Road and Hart Hwy. on February 12th. Anyone with information should contact the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office.

On Thursday, February 18th Eaton County Deputies responded to a vehicle parked in the travel lanes of St. Joe Hwy and Creyts. The driver was asleep in the driver’s seat. Subject was lodged on outstanding warrants.

On Friday, February 19th Eaton County Deputies were busy with many accidents and trees across the roads. An Eaton County Deputy was at a crash on Valley Highway when the deputy saw a brush fire. The wind was spreading the fire fast and Vermontville Township Fire Department was called and put the fire out before it reached a nearby home.

At 0657 hours on February 19th, the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office was sent to a Personal Injury Accident on Royston Road near Steele Hwy in Hamlin Township.  Two vehicles were involved in the crash and both drivers suffered life threatening injuries.  Upon initial investigation, it appears that the crash was a head on collision and the drivers were both the lone occupants of the vehicle.  Airbags were deployed in both vehicle and there is no indication at this point that alcohol was a factor in the crash.  Royston Road will be closed while the investigation is completed.

The Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Hamlin Township Fire Department, Eaton Rapids City Fire Department, Eaton Area EMS and University of Michigan Life Flight.

On 2/22/2016 at approximately 8:11 a.m., Eaton County Deputies were dispatched to an armed robbery at the Dollar General store at 4359 W. Saginaw Hwy. in Delta Township.  The suspect entered the store and while armed with a handgun, demanded money from the employees.  The suspect was able to flee the store westbound on foot with an undisclosed amount of money.  A K-9 unit was brought in but the track was unsuccessful. 

The suspect is described as a black male, approximately 6 feet tall, and was estimated to be in his 30’s.  The suspect was last seen wearing a black hoodie, black pants, black and white Nike shoes, black mask, and glasses.

During the robbery, the suspect physically struck one of the employees.  The employee was treated for the injury at a local hospital.

Please contact Detective Burton at 517-323-8480 if you have any information on this robbery.

Craigslist Crimes: Police See Rise in Robberies In Michigan

If you're going to buy something on Craigslist or on any social media or internet site there are a couple of safety precautions you should take.
  1. Check out the seller's information: Ask for a phone number and an address. Take that information, and then check the names of the seller online to find out who you are dealing with.
  2. Ask a lot of questions: Ask as many questions as you can before going to buy the product. If the seller can't answer your questions, there is a good chance that he doesn't actually have the product, and could be setting you up.
  3. Don't buy from sellers who only list an email address: This is a HUGE RED FLAG. If they don't list their phone number, the seller usually has something to hide.
  4. Meet in a public place - Criminals don't want witnesses; meeting in a public place like a coffee shop or cafe can help ensure your safety.  Most of the criminals on Craigslist are looking for an easy target and are not very likely to rob you in a cafe full of people.
  5. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is: A lot of these Craigslist scams are pretty easy to spot. If the deal sounds too good to be true, you are better off passing it up.
  6. Never go to a second location - If you arrive at the predetermined meeting place and the seller asks to go to another place, this should raise some serious red flags. There is no reason for a seller to ask you to go somewhere else.
  7. Don't go alone. You should always have someone with you who can watch your back.
  8. Show up early: If you are meeting in a public location, show up early and scope out the area. Watch for the seller, and make sure everything looks legit. If you have even the slightest concern that something seems out of place, trust your instincts and leave.


February 10, 2016

 

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

 

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

 

23 Alarms 20 Assist Citizens
8 Assaults 18 Car/deer accidents
10 Cars in the ditch

14

Check well being
6 Disorderly person 16 Domestic disputes
3 Drug overdose 29 Shoplifting
21 Malicious destruction of property

13

Motorist assists
12 Operating while impaired 6 Personal injury crash
55 Property damage crash 15 Suspicious subjects
22 Traffic hazards 255 Traffic stops
19 Traffic violations 31 Vacation checks

 

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 918 calls for service.

 

On Friday, February 5th Eaton County Deputies Delta Patrol were called to an apartment building. The resident came home and discovered the door was locked from the inside by a chain. After investigation Deputies find foot prints and a suspect was developed from information received by the victim and a suspect was arrested and lodged.

 

On Saturday, February 6th, Eaton County Deputies assisted Lansing Mall Security with several fights at the mall. One juvenile was taken to the juvenile facility and another turned over to parents.

 

Eaton County Deputies assisted Charlotte Police and Michigan State Police on Sunday, February 7th on a suspicious subject that had stopped at a local gas station. When the subject was removed from the vehicle a loaded gun was found under the subject’s leg.

 

Phone Scams Continue to be a Serious Threat

 

The following information was shared by the IRS regarding the phone scams that continue.

 

Aggressive and threatening phone calls by criminals impersonating IRS agents remain a major threat to taxpayers, headlining the annual "Dirty Dozen" list of tax scams for the 2016 filing season, the Internal Revenue Service announced today.

 

The IRS has seen a surge of these phone scams as scam artists threaten police arrest, deportation, license revocation and other things. The IRS reminds taxpayers to guard against all sorts of con games that arise during any filing season.

 

Taxpayers across the nation face a deluge of these aggressive phone scams. Don't be fooled by callers pretending to be from the IRS in an attempt to steal your money. If you are surprised to be hearing from the IRS, then you're not hearing from the IRS.

 

There are many variations. The caller may threaten you with arrest or court action to trick you into making a payment. Some schemes may say you're entitled to a huge refund. These all add up to trouble. Some simple tips can help protect you.

 

The Dirty Dozen is compiled annually by the IRS and lists a variety of common scams taxpayers may encounter any time during the year. Many of these con games peak during filing season as people prepare their tax returns or hire someone to do so.

 

This January, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) announced they have received reports of roughly 896,000 contacts since October 2013 and have become aware of over 5,000 victims who have collectively paid over $26.5 million as a result of the scam.

 

Protect Yourself

 

Scammers make unsolicited calls claiming to be IRS officials. They demand that the victim pay a bogus tax bill. They con the victim into sending cash, usually through a prepaid debit card or wire transfer. They may also leave “urgent” callback requests through phone “robo-calls,” or via a phishing email.

 

Many phone scams use threats to intimidate and bully a victim into paying. They may even threaten to arrest, deport or revoke the license of their victim if they don’t get the money.

 

Scammers often alter caller ID numbers to make it look like the IRS or another agency is calling. The callers use IRS titles and fake badge numbers to appear legitimate. They may use the victim’s name, address and other personal information to make the call sound official.

 

Here are five things the scammers often do but the IRS will not do. Any one of these five things is a tell-tale sign of a scam.

 

The IRS will never:

 

  • Call to demand immediate payment, nor will the agency call about taxes owed without first having mailed you a bill.
  • Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe.
  • Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.
  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  • Threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have you arrested for not paying.

 

If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS and asking for money, here’s what you should do:

 

If you don’t owe taxes, or have no reason to think that you do:

 

  • Do not give out any information. Hang up immediately.
  • Contact TIGTA to report the call. Use their “IRS Impersonation Scam Reporting” web page. You can also call 800-366-4484.
  • Report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Use the “FTC Complaint Assistant” on FTC.gov. Please add "IRS Telephone Scam" in the notes.

 

If you know you owe, or think you may owe tax:

 

  • Call the IRS at 800-829-1040. IRS workers can help you.

 

Stay alert to scams that use the IRS as a lure. Tax scams can happen any time of year, not just at tax time. For more, visit “Tax Scams and Consumer Alerts” on IRS.gov.

 

Each and every taxpayer has a set of fundamental rights they should be aware of when dealing with the IRS. These are your Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Explore your rights and our obligations to protect them on IRS.gov.

 

Yours in Public Safety,

 

Sheriff Tom Reich


February 3, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

22 Alarms 23 Assist Citizens
3 Breaking and entering 25 Car/deer accidents
13 Cars in the ditch

10

Check well being
14 Disorderly person 11 Domestic disputes
31 Shoplifting 10 Larcenies
10 Malicious destruction of property

11

Motorist assists
10 Operating while impaired 8 Personal injury crash
56 Property damage crash 14 Suspicious subjects
22 Traffic hazards 269 Traffic stops
17 Traffic violations 42 Vacation checks

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 911 calls for service.

The first Eaton County Sheriff Citizen Police Academy graduated on Thursday, February 4. Topics covered were patrol operations, traffic enforcement, corrections, emergency services, detective bureau, computer forensics, meth team enforcement, hostage negotiations and use of force. Thirty-two citizens will be recognized.

Eaton County Sheriff Reich was advised by Michigan State Police that in 2015 Eaton County Sheriff’s Office investigated 42 meth labs which was one of the highest in the tri county area.

Do 1 Thing for February

Small steps toward being prepared for an emergency

Whether you live in the country or the city, most water supplies relies on electricity to run the system. During a power outage you may find yourself without a way to get water. Your water supply can also become unsafe to drink. Both private wells and city water systems can be contaminated in a disaster.

  • Purchase and store at least 72-hour supply of commercially bottled water:

            A three day supply for one person is three gallons of water. Also include an extra gallon for a medium size pet.

During an emergency you should drink at least two quarts of water a day. Drink 2-4 quarts a day if you are in a hot climate, pregnant, sick or for children. Some of the water in your emergency water supply will be used for cooking or washing.

If you buy commercially bottled water, it should be replaced once a year. Store water in a cool, dark place to keep it tasting fresher longer.

  • Bottle a 72 hour supply of water at home.

If you get your water from a private well, disinfect your tap water before bottling. Place 6 drops of bleach for each gallon of water, shake well, then let sit for 30 minutes. If you get your water from a municipal water system there is no need to disinfect tap water before bottling.

Sanitize bottles before filling by washing the containers with soap and rinse with water. Sanitize by washing a solution of 1 teaspoon of liquid household chlorine bleach to a quart of water on all interior surfaces of the container and let air dry for at least one minute.

Use clear plastic bottles with tight sealing caps. Milk jugs do not make good water storage containers, they don’t seal well and the water stored in them can sometimes develop a plastic taste. Only use bottles that originally had beverages in them such as plastic soft drink bottles.

  • Learn how to provide a safe supply of drinking water for your household in a disaster.

Water heater – do not use if the tank of fixtures have been submerged in floodwater. Turn off the gas or electricity to the water heater (turn off electricity at the fuse or breaker box, turn off gas by locating the valve supplying the hot water heater and turning the valve handle so that is crosses-is not lined up with the gas line).

Turn off the water intake valve which should be located near the water heater.

Open the drain at the bottom of the tank.

Turn on a hot water faucet-the water will drain from the tank not the faucet. Discard the first few gallons if they contain rust or sediment. Do not turn the gas or electricity back on until the tank is refilled.

Pipes-Turn off main water valve where the water comes into the house which is usually near the water meter if you have city water.

Let air into the pipes by turning on the faucet located at the highest point in the house.

Get water from the faucet located at the lowest point in the house – never get water from faucets that have been submerged in floodwater.

Ice- If you have freezer space consider freezing part of the water supply. This has the added advantage of keeping food in the freezer cold longer during a power outage.

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


January 27, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

31 Alarms 14 Assist Citizens
6 Breaking and entering 41 Car/deer accidents
17 Cars in the ditch

13

Check well being
15 Domestic disputes 5 Drug offenses
33 Shoplifting 14 Larcenies
20 Motorist assists

7

Operating while impaired
6 Personal injury crashes 48 Property damage crashes
11 Suspicious situations 12 Suspicious vehicles
26 Traffic hazards 254 Traffic stops
19 Traffic violations 37 Vacation checks

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 863 calls for service.

The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office is currently investigating a two vehicle crash that occurred on January 26, 2016 around 9am near E. Clinton Trail and Perkey Road in Eaton Township. A 2003 GMC Yukon was traveling westbound on E. Clinton Trial and attempted to turn left into the M-50 Party Store into the path of a 2003 Ford Focus which was traveling eastbound on E. Clinton Trail. The driver of the GMC was a 48 year old Eaton Rapids man who sustained non-life threatening injuries. The driver of the Ford Focus was a 20 year old Eaton Rapids woman who was pinned in her vehicle. She was extricated by the Charlotte Fire Department.  Her injuries are believed to be non-life threatening at this time. Both subjects were transported by Eaton Area EMS to Lansing hospitals. Both drivers were the only occupants of their respective vehicles. The accident remains under investigation by the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office.

At 4:15 p.m. on Tuesday, January 26, 2016, Eaton County Deputies Delta Patrol responded to a school bus/car personal injury crash on W. Michigan Ave. and S. Creyts Road.

It was reported that a car southbound on S. Creyts Road went through a stop light and struck a Grand Ledge school bus that was eastbound on W. Michigan.

One school bus passenger received minor injuries when the child bumped his head on a window. The driver of the car was transported with non-life threatening injuries.

The children were transferred to a second school bus and taken on their route home.

The crash remains under investigation at this time.

Safe Driving Tips for Winter

Sheriff Tom Reich and the Michigan Sheriffs' Association recommend the following tips to keep you and your family safe while driving in winter weather:

No matter the season, drinking and driving is dangerous and illegal.

Make sure your vehicle is in good working order.

Check wiper blades

Fill up on antifreeze and window-washer fluid

Check for proper tire inflation

Ensure your battery has sufficient charge and that the battery terminals are clean. If the battery is older than three years have it tested.

Keep an emergency kit ready in your vehicle. It should include:

  • A blanket and warm clothes (boots, coat, gloves)
  • A flashlight
  • Jumper cables
  • Tow rope
  • Shovel
  • Bag of sand or cat litter for traction
  • Cell phone charger
  • State map to use in case of a detour
  • Snacks such as raisins, candy bars or other items that store well and bottled water

To avoid slipping off the roadway, drive slowly and give yourself more room to stop.

  • Brake gently to prevent skidding in ABS equipped vehicles use a firm, steady pressure without pumping. If you do not have ABS equipped vehicle gently pump the brake pedal without locking up the brakes.
  • If your vehicle begins to skid, do not brake and steer the vehicle in the direction you wish to go.

If your vehicle does get stuck:

  • Never spin your wheels. That only digs the tires in more deeply
  • Use a shovel to dig around the wheels and undercarriage
  • Turn the steering wheel from side to side to clear snow away from the front tires
  • Gently ease the vehicle out
  • If that doesn't work, try rocking the vehicle by shifting into forward and giving it some gas and then shifting it into reverse and accelerating until the vehicle is free

Let other people know your travel plans so if you don't arrive they'll know where to start looking. On longer trips ensure you take a break.

Tell people the route you plan to take

Make sure your vehicle has fresh air if you become stuck by checking the exhaust system to see if it's plugged by snow.

  • Open a window or turn off your car if necessary
  • Carbon monoxide produced by your vehicle is a colorless, odorless gas that can kill

Check the news for weather reports or visit weather sites such as www.weather.gov.


January 20, 2016

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

36 Alarms 1 Armed Robbery
21 Assist citizens 16 Assist other police departments
32 Car/deer accidents

42

Cars in the ditch
17 Check well being 14 Domestic disputes
39 Shoplifting 7 Larcenies
22 Motorist assists

11

Operating while impaired
16 Personal injury crashes 78 Property damage crashes
17 Suspicious situations 19 Suspicious vehicles
30 Traffic hazards 261 Traffic stops
16 Traffic violations 38 Vacation checks

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 990 calls for service.

On 01/15/16 at approximately 3:15 AM Eaton County Deputies were dispatched to the area of Hartel Road south of Davis highway in Benton Township in reference to a one vehicle personal injury crash. The driver was the lone occupant of the vehicle and was transported to a local hospital with serious injuries.
Preliminary investigation revealed the vehicle was traveling south on Hartel Road at a high rate of speed. The vehicle left the road and appeared to roll. Hartel was closed in both directions for several hours during the investigation. The accident is still under investigation by the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office.

Driver – Ian Cain, 30 years old from Charlotte, MI. Mr. Cain is in critical condition at this time. Preliminary investigation shows he lost control of his vehicle and the vehicle rolled.

SHERIFF REICH STRESSES SNOWMOBILE SAFETY

Due to the fluctuation in temperatures this winter, Eaton County Sheriff Tom Reich would like to remind snowmobilers to be cautious. Because it can take two weeks or more of consistent, below freezing temperatures for the ice on lakes, streams and ponds to freeze thick enough to support a snowmobile Sheriff Reich urges riders to stay off the ice.

Further safety tips from Sheriff Reich:

  • Always keep your machine in top mechanical condition.
  • Always wear insulated boots and protective clothing, including a helmet, gloves and eye protection.
  • Never ride alone.
  • Avoid, when possible, crossing frozen bodies of water.
  • Always be alert to avoid fences and low strung wires.
  • Never operate your snowmobiles in a single file line when crossing frozen bodies of water.
  • When crossing bodies of water it is recommended that you leave about a football field in length between snowmobiles. That way if the first machine breaks through the ice the others will have time to stop.
  • Never operate your snowmobile on a street or highway.
  • Always look for depressions in the snow.
  • Keep headlights and taillights on at all times.
  • When approaching an intersection, come to a complete stop, raise off the seat and look for traffic.
  • Always check weather conditions before you depart.
  • Never operate your snowmobile on railroad tracks.
  • Never operate your snowmobile while under the influence of alcohol.

Snowmobile operators must abide by the same regulations as drivers and Sheriff Reich will have his

Deputies out on patrol to make sure Eaton County residents stay safe this winter.

For more safety tips Sheriff Reich encourages residents to visit the Michigan Sheriffs’ Association website at

www.misheriff.org where you can sign up to receive monthly newsletters.

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


January 13, 2015

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

25 Alarms 26 Assist citizens
4 Breaking and Enterings 6 Assaults
33 Car/deer accidents

7

Cars in the ditch
8 Disorderly persons 11 Domestic disputes
42 Shoplifting 9 Larcenies
20 Motorist assists

15

Operating while impaired
6 Personal injury crashes 42 Property damage crashes
17 Suspicious situations 15 Suspicious vehicles
24 Traffic hazards 336 Traffic stops
18 Traffic violations 50 Vacation checks

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 1008 calls for service.

Mark your calendars! The second annual 5 O 5K Run will be held on Saturday, April 16th at Sharp Park in Delta Township. Visit runsignup.com/Race/MI/Lansing/FIVEO5K or contact the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office at 517-543-5019 for more information.

On 1/4/2016 at approximately 5:30p.m., Eaton County Deputies responded to an armed robbery at Advance America at 6229 W. Saginaw Hwy in Delta Township.  It was reported that the suspect entered the store and presented a knife and made threats to the employee demanding cash.  The suspect was able to escape with an undisclosed amount of cash.  A canine track was attempted with no success.  No one was injured during the robbery.

The suspect is described as a black male in his mid twenties approximately 5’8” to 5’10” in height, average build.  He was last seen wearing a dark blue hooded sweatshirt, grey pants and a beanie style hat. 

The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office is asking anyone with information on the robbery or identity of the suspect to contact Detective Roberts at (517) 816-8199.

Another Eaton County resident had an attempted scam from someone posing first as a "Detective Beasley" from an attorney's office at 423-207-1042 claiming she had a check and go loan she owed money on. The victim was able to call the number and talk to someone so that the number was an actual working number. After the intended victim would not pay and hung up, she received a "Spoofed" call showing the Sheriff's Office's number on the caller ID. The caller stated:

"This is the Eaton County Sheriff's Office here at 1025 Independence Boulevard. Ms [[[VICTIM'S NAME]]], I need you to call down to the station right now regarding express warrant charges from an attorney's firm. Not sure who you pissed off over there. You may want call them back and get this case resolved. You have about 30 minutes 'till we get an officer there.

This is NOT anyone from our department and at no time will we direct you to work something out with an attorney or debt collector to take care of a warrant. If there is ever a warrant issued, it has to be taken up with the courts and the only payment would be for bond and that would be taken care of by someone in person, whether someone actually posting it AT the court or through a bondsman. Nothing will be done by credit card or electronic payment over the phone.

On 1/11/2016 at 6:50 p.m., Eaton County Deputies responded to Cosmo Prof at 6005 W. Saginaw in Delta Township on a report of an armed robbery.  The victim said that the suspect came into the store and displayed a handgun demanding money.  The suspect was able to escape the store on foot with an undetermined amount of cash.  No one was injured in the robbery.

The suspect is described as a black male in his 30’s.  He is approximately 6 foot tall and 180-200 pounds.  He was last seen wearing a mask on his face and black clothing.  He was described as having a foreign accent.

The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office asks that anyone who has information regarding this incident to contact Det. Buxton at (517) 323-8484.

8 Easy Ways to Deter Home Burglars

The following information was shared with Sheriff Reich from Home Security Resource. For more information visit homesecurityresource.org

Home burglaries typically aren't elaborate, well planned heists. Most of the time, burglars are simply looking for an easy mark: unlocked doors, empty houses, and valuables left in plain sight ripe for the picking.

While the most foolproof way to deter burglars is to invest in a home security system, often all you have to do to turn off a burglar's interests is to simply not make it easy to break in. That could be as simple as locking your doors, installing lights, and asking neighbors to pick up mail when you're not home.

We've identified eight of the easiest ways to make your home unattractive to burglars. They're either free or low cost, and often, just require simple, easy tweaks that don't take a lot of effort. Try out these ideas to make your home safer today.

#1: Lock Your Doors and Windows

This sounds like a no brainer, but the importance of locking up your home cannot be overstated. Leaving doors or windows unlocked, or worse, open, is like rolling out the red carpet for burglars. All they have to do is walk in.

Think you're not doing it? Someone is. In 2013, 34.3% of burglaries did not require forcible entry. That means in more than a third of burglaries, the burglars were able to gain entry through an unlocked door or window.

It should go without saying, but it's important to always lock your front and back doors, even when you're home. Your windows should be closed when you're not home, and you should lock them as soon as they are closed. Don't forget to lock your upstairs windows, too: it's easy to gain access with a ladder. Also consider the security of your garage door, which can also allow access into your home.

Don't just hand over your key, either. Avoid leaving a spare key out where a burglar can simply pick up a rock and discover it. Instead, give a spare key to a trusted neighbor who you can visit to gain access.
 

#2: Show Signs of Life

Burglars prefer to hit homes where no one is home -- and even better if no one has been at home for a while. That means they can take their time getting in, taking what they want, and getting out. If your home looks like it might be vacant, or even if you're just gone for a few days, you're more likely to be targeted.

Take a look at your front yard. If you've got overgrown grass, a full mailbox, and a few papers to pick up, you're sending a message to burglars that no one is home. Mow your lawn, collect mail, papers, and packages.

If you're going to be away from home, ask for help from neighbors or hire a service to cut your grass or shovel snow so that it appears you're still home. And of course, ask a neighbor or friend to stop by and collect mail and packages.

It's also a good idea to use a timing device around the clock and especially when you won't be home. With a timing device, you can set lights, radio, and other electronics to turn off or on whether you're home or not, giving the appearance that you are at home.
 

#3: Always Answer Your Door

When your door bell rings, you never know who is on the other side of the door. A burglar could be dressed as a solicitor or repair person while attempting to gain access to your home. And while you certainly don't want to open the door and allow them to come in, it's not smart to simply ignore them. Why? Often, burglars will ring the door bell first to see if someone is home. And if you don't answer, you're telling them the house is empty -- and free to explore.

In 2013, almost 30% of burglaries had household members present, and 26% of them became victims of violent crime. It should go without saying that while it's best to never have a burglar in your home, you certainly don't want to be there if it happens.

Instead of ignoring the front door with an unknown person behind it, make yourself known. Use your peephole to see who is there, and if you're not expecting them or don't recognize them, simply tell them you're not interested. They may continue to engage with you to encourage you to open the door, but at this point, you've done your part: you let them know you are home and that your house is no longer an easy target. Most likely, they'll simply walk away and move on to another house.
 

#4: Hide Your Valuables

How easy is it to see what you have in your house? Even behind closed doors, it can be easy to see through windows and garage door windows. If you have a nice camera, large TV, multiple mobile devices, jewelry, or other valuables within sight, burglars may see your home as an attractive target.

Move items away from the view of windows that you may open, or simply keep shades or blinds in easy to see places closed. Consider frosting your garage door windows if you have them. Also, don't leave valuable items like bicycles in your front yard. Not only does this make it easy to take them, it can send a message that you may leave other valuable items lying around as well.

If you make a big purchase like a TV, avoid putting the empty box out as is with your recycling. Break it down, turn it inside out, and try to fit it in the bin with the rest of your recyclables. Otherwise, you could be advertising your new purchase to burglars on the street.
 

#5: Make Entry Points Unattractive

Burglars love a hidden door or window. That means if you have lots of shrubbery or trees near your windows, or if your front door is blocked from view, you're more likely to be burglarized than your neighbors without these issues.

You can't move your front door, but you can install lighting. Make sure that your doors, both front and back, are well lit. Ideally, you should install motion sensing lights that call attention to the presence of movement.

Around windows and fences, trim back any shrubbery that might make it easy for a burglar to hide or gain access. Motion sensing lights are useful in these areas as well. Also, consider thorny shrubs around windows that will make it not just unattractive, but painful for burglars to gain entry into your home.
 

#6: Store Valuables Away from Your Master Bedroom

It won't stop a burglar from getting into your home, but storing valuables away from your master bedroom can protect your belongings. Usually, the master bedroom is the first place a burglar will look for valuables. They'll see if you have cash or valuables like jewelry in your nightstand, and rifle through the rest of your belongings for electronics, guns, drugs, and more.

It's best to store valuables outside of your master bedroom. Burglars are less likely to look in your attic, basement, hall closets, or kitchen. Even children’s' bedrooms are often bypassed, particularly young children who probably don't have electronics in their rooms. Don't think you're being clever by hiding valuables in the freezer, however. Burglars have known that trick for years.

Your best bet is to get a home safe that is bolted securely to your home. Make it easy for you to access, like in your basement or even in a hall closet, but make sure it isn't easy to remove -- as burglars are happy to just take it with them and work out how to get inside of it later.
 

#7: Never Give Clues You Won't Be Home

Serious burglars spend time staking out the homes they want to hit. They'll watch your patterns, read your social media, and keep an eye out for cars, work schedules, and other details to find their best opportunity to find an open, empty house.

If you have a garage, use it. Parking in your garage makes it difficult for a burglar to know when you're home and when you're not. If there's never a car in the driveway, the absence of one doesn't tell them that you're not home -- it just tells them things are normal.

Predictable patterns can help burglars as well. If you leave for work and return at the exact same time every day, burglars know just how long they have to get in and out before you make it home. Consider breaking routines on a regular basis to show any burglars who might be watching that you could come home and discover them at any time.

Don't send out a message online that you won't be home as well. It's fun to discuss your travel plans, but keep in mind that by doing so, you could be broadcasting to burglars that your home will be empty and easy to access. It's best to simply wait until you get home and post photos of your trip if you'd like.
 

#8: Get a Best Friend

If you can't be home yourself, a dog is the next best thing. Large breeds are the most intimidating to burglars, as they can be more dangerous if they attack, but regardless of size, any dog that barks is a problem for burglars. Why? A barking dog could alert neighbors to the fact that they have broken in.

Already have a dog at home? Make sure their presence is known. Consider getting a Beware of Dog sign to let burglars know that they won't be opening up an empty house, and will likely be confronted with a dog, small or large.

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


Weekly Update

January 6, 2015

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

32 Alarms 17 Assist citizens
32 Car/deer accidents 12 Cars in the ditch
19 Check well being

11

Disorderly persons
19 Domestic disputes 13 Shoplifting
20 Larcenies 18 Motorist assists
7 Personal injury crashes

43

Property damage crashes
16 Suspicious situations 34 Traffic hazards
232 Traffic stops 10 Traffic violations
10 Trespassing 39 Vacation checks

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 818 calls for service.

On Monday, December 28th, Eaton County Deputies Delta Patrol stopped a vehicle on Saginaw Highway going at a high rate of speed. The driver had a five year old child in the vehicle and the driver was lodge on Operating while Intoxicated and Child Endangerment.

On Thursday, December 31st, Eaton County Deputies assisted Charlotte Police with a jack-knifed truck on I69 at the 60 mile marker. Traffic was diverted for several hours.

On January 2, 2016 at 12:01 am, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office Deputies were dispatched to a residence on West St. in Delta Twp. on a reported fight with gunshots fired. There were several 911 calls made by persons in the residence who had been participating in a family gathering. While responding to the scene, Deputies located some of the victims/witnesses near Lansing road and Millett Hwy who identified a male family member/ suspect who they said had fired gunshots at them.  Deputies observed a bullet hole in one of the victim's vehicles.  Deputies who arrived at the residence observed the suspect leaving in a vehicle driven by another male and were able to stop the vehicle and detain the suspect.  Deputies recovered a pistol, magazine and ammunition. Further investigation at the scene indicated several persons had been felonious assaulted and gunshots had been fired at two of these victims by the male suspect. None of the victims were struck by the gunfire.  It was reported that the incident began when the suspect had physically assaulted his girlfriend in the residence and family members intervened inside and outside of the residence (no serious injuries).  Eaton County Sheriff Tom Reich thanks the Lansing Twp. Police Department, Grand Ledge Police Department and the Michigan State Police for their response and valuable assistance on this incident.

The 26 year old male suspect, a resident of Lansing, was arrested for assault with intent to murder, felonious assault, domestic assault, possession of a stolen firearm, felon in possession of a firearm and lodged in the Eaton County Jail.  Charges are being sought from the Eaton County Prosecutors Office. 

As in the case of every arrest, the suspect is presumed innocent until proven guilty.

On Sunday, January 3rd, Eaton County Deputies assisted by the Michigan State Police responded to a suspicious subject on Irish Road. Deputies located the subject with items that appeared to be stolen from a vehicle parked at the residence. Subject was lodged in the Eaton County Jail.

ICE SAFETY

There is no ice that is 100 % safe.  The following information is a recommended guide to help judge recreational use of clear, solid blue ice and help you minimize your risk:

5" inches thick minimum for general use (fisherman, ice skaters, and foot traffic)
8" inches thick minimum for travel by snowmobile, Off Road Vehicle (ORV)

(It is not recommended automobiles travel out on the ice.  This also voids any insurance claims)

Survey the ice, keeping in mind that ice conditions change day by day, lake by lake, and location by location on the same body of water.  Some signs of changing ice conditions can be, but are not limited to: moving water near a stream, river, unseen spring or inlet, slushy areas, depressions in the snow, heavy snow, white “milky” or black colored ice and “frazzle” ice weakened by the freeze-thaw cycles.  Frazzle ice is pocketed with tiny air pockets and often looks like frozen slush. These are all signs of thin ice or unsafe ice.

  • Do not go out alone on the ice.  Always take a partner or someone who can call 911 or go for help in an emergency. 
  • Do not make the first tracks on the ice.  Check with someone who has experience with a particular lake or pond before you venture out on the ice.
  • Always leave a travel plan with someone who can call for help and direct a search party if you do not return. Plan ahead by dressing appropriately for changing weather conditions.  Dress in layers to protect all exposed parts of your body.  Consider wearing a personal flotation device (PFD) as part of your overall protective clothing or a flotation jacket or suit.  Ice creepers attached to boots will help to keep you stable on the ice and can assist in self-rescue.
  • Bring safety items which may include: cell phone, whistle, rope, ice pick or awls, screw driver, hand flares, flashlight, throw able PFD.  Plan ahead for a rescue.
  • Check and double check the ice thickness with an ice spud, auger or cordless drill.  If you discover a weak spot, retrace your route off the ice.  Keep a distance between others in your group.
  • If you hear the ice crack or detect unsafe ice you should stay spread out, immediately lie down (which will distribute your weight) and crawl back to safer ice by the same way you came.
  • If someone falls through the ice, do not run to the hole.  First call 911 and get help on the way and then use a pole, branch, rope or any other handy object, which can be extended to the victim from a safe position.  You cannot help if you also become a victim.
  • If you fall through the ice, do not panic, because this will only hinder your self-rescue actions.  Call out for help and kick your feet while getting your hands and then arms up onto safer ice.  This is when the ice awl or screwdriver will help you with your self-rescue.  Continue to "swim" up onto the ice far enough to crawl or "roll-out" to safer ice.
  • Snowmobiles, ORV's and vehicles on the ice increase your risk of falling through, especially at night.  Many accidents occur when operators are driving at a high rate of speed (over driving) and are unable to slow or stop in time to avoid open water or unsafe ice. 
  • Pets that venture onto unsafe ice are another major cause for many near drownings and deaths.  If you find your pet has ventured out onto the ice, resist the urge to go out after them.  Stay at a safe position on shore and persuade them back to safety. 
  • Wildlife that ventures onto unsafe ice is a natural occurrence.  Wildlife such as deer are strong swimmers prepared for cold weather and find their own way off the ice.  Most often, wildlife discovered in the water are injured and succumb to injuries from predators or natural forces.


December 16, 2015

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

27 Alarms 23 Assist citizens
28 Car/deer accidents 17 Check well being calls
20 Domestic disputes

45

Shoplifting complaints
21 Larcenies 13 Motorist assists
23 Operating while impaired 4 Personal injury crashes
48 Property damage crashes

33

Suspicious situations
26 Traffic hazards 232 Traffic stops
23 Traffic violations 23 Vacation checks

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 942 calls for service.

On Thursday, December 10th, Eaton County Deputies responded to a rollover personal injury crash on southbound I69 near the 55 mile marker. Driver was transported to a local hospital.

Also on the 10th Eaton County Deputies responded to a rollover crash on VFW and Smithville. The vehicle was unoccupied and with the assistance of Hamlin Fire Department, Michigan State Police K9 and Eaton Rapids Police Department the area was searched and none of the occupants were located.

On 12/11/2015 at approximately 2:20 a.m., Eaton County Deputies were dispatched to a suspicious subject call in the 5000 Block of River Ridge Drive in Delta Township.  Shortly after the original call, Eaton County 911 received a second call, in the same area of the first call, of a vehicle that had crashed into a yard.  Deputies arrived on scene to the vehicle crash and determined the driver was operating while intoxicated.  Eaton County Deputies also began to investigate the original suspicious subject call and discovered that there had been three windows broken out of three different vehicles at the original callers address.  They also discovered that a fire had been intentionally set in the area of the gas tank on one of the damaged vehicles.  Delta Township Fire Department responded as well as their Fire Investigator.  The Fire Investigator from the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office responded to the scene as well.  During the investigation, it was determined that the suspect in the crash was also the suspect in the arson and malicious destruction of property.  It was also discovered that the suspect had gained access to the original caller’s garage.  The suspect was arrested and charged with two counts of arson, home invasion, malicious destruction of property, and operating while intoxicated.  This is not believed to be a random incident.  This vehicle arson is not believed to be connected to the vehicle arson in Windsor Twp on 12/10/2015.

On 12/11/2015 at approximately 12:20p.m., Eaton County Deputies responded to a local Delta Township Motel.  Management from the motel called to advise that the cleaning crew had discovered suspected narcotics inside of a room.  During the investigation, two suspects returned to the motel and were detained.  A search warrant was obtained for the motel room and a large quantity of suspected heroin was located.  The heroin was packaged in individual packets.  This type of packaging and the amount of packets lead Deputies to believe the narcotics were going to be sold.  A small quantity of suspected cocaine was also located.  The suspects were arrested for possession with intent to deliver heroin and possession with intent to deliver cocaine.

On 12/11/2015 at approximately 12:20p.m., Eaton County Deputies conducted a narcotics investigation at a local Delta Township Motel.  .  During the investigation, two suspects returned to the motel and were detained.  A search warrant was obtained for the motel room and a quantity of suspected heroin was located.  The heroin was packaged in individual packets.  This type of packaging and the amount of packets lead Deputies to believe the narcotics were going to be sold.  A small quantity of suspected cocaine was also located.  The suspects were arrested for possession with intent to deliver heroin and possession with intent to deliver cocaine.

Suspects have been arraigned on Felony Possession with intent to Deliver Controlled substances charges. 

SocialNetworkingSafetyTips

From the Computer Crime Investigative Unit of the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command, Sheriff Reich shares this important information regarding social media.

Social networkingsitesallowpeople to interactwith othersandfind people with similarinterestsor backgrounds. Social networkingsites enjoyworldwide popularity,underscoring the need tounderstand potential risksassociated with the useofthese sites.Aperson’s online activities mayinadvertentlyexpose excessive information about theiridentity,location, relationships,and affiliations,creating an increasedrisk ofidentitytheft, stalking, ortargeted violence.

A safersocial networking experience is available byaccepting some basicassumptions andfollowingafewrecommendations.

Assumptions:

   Oncesomething isposted onasocial networkingsite,itcan quicklyspread. No amountofeffort will eraseit– theInternet does notforget.

   You arenot anonymouson theInternet.

   There are people ontheInternet who arenotwho theypurport to beand will takeadvantage ofyou ifaffordedthe opportunity.

   Participatinginmoresocial networking sitesincreasesyour attacksurfaceand overall risk.

   Everyone on the Internet can seewhatyou post, fromwhere you postit,who yourfriendsand associatesare, the commentsyour friendsmakeand your wittyreplies.

   An embarrassing commentorimagewill comeback tohaunt you…one daywhen you leastexpect itat theleastopportune time.

   There is acompleterecord ofyouronline activity...somewhere.

Recommendations:

   Do notpost anything you would beembarrassedto seeonthe eveningnews.

   Do notacceptfriend/followerrequestsfromanyone you do not know;independently verify identities.

   Avoid usingthird-partyapplications;ifneeded, donot allowthem to accessyour social networking accounts,friends listor address books.

   Do notpost personally identifiable information.

   Be cautiousabouttheimages you post.Whatis in them maybe morerevealing than who isinthem. Imagesposted overtime mayform a completemosaicofyou and your family.

   Do notallowotherstotag you in imagestheypost. Doingso makes you easierto locate andaccuratelyconstructyour networkof friends,relatives and associates.

   Securelyconfigureyour social networking accountstominimize who cansee your information.

For more information go to slamtheonlinescam.com/, netsmartz.org/Parents and onguardonline.gov

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


December 9, 2015

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

27 Alarms 30 Assist citizens
27 Car/deer accidents 12 Check well being calls
11 Domestic disputes

36

Shoplifting complaints
22 Larcenies 12 Motorist assists
15 Operating while impaired 6 Personal injury crashes
45 Property damage crashes

28

Suspicious situations
24 Traffic hazards 222 Traffic stops
32 Traffic violations

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 871 calls for service.

On December 1st, 2015 at approximately 11:40 a.m., Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to a two vehicle personal injury crash on N. Clinton Trail (M-50) between Vermontville Hwy and Gresham Hwy.

A pickup truck driven by a 46 year old female from Mulliken was traveling south bound on M50 and was slowing down to make a left turn into a driveway as a semi truck driven by a 55 year old male from Indiana also traveling south bound on M-50 attempted to pass the pickup and struck the pickup truck.

Driver of the pickup truck was transported with non-life threatening injuries.

On 12/04/2015, Eaton County Deputies were dispatched to a local gas station in Delta Township.  A gas station employee was making a scheduled check on the gas pumps and noticed one of the gas pumps appeared to have been tampered with.  After further checking, the employee found a credit card “skimmer” located inside of the pump.  Eaton County Deputies responded and removed the skimmer.  At this point, it does not appear anyone’s personal information or credit card information was stolen due to the employee’s attention to detail during the gas pump checks.

The credit card skimmers are not able to be observed by consumers from outside of the pump.  The credit card skimmers are placed inside of the electronic area of the pumps by suspects.  Once the skimmer is in place, the suspects are able to capture the credit card/debit card information of the consumers using the pumps.

If you suspect a gas pump has been tampered with, please contact the attendant to verify that the pump is in proper working condition.  The attendant will call their local police if the gas pump has been compromised.

On Saturday, December 5th, Eaton County Deputies responding to numerous reports of a wrong way driver who was going northbound in the southbound land of I69 during very foggy conditions. Deputy Cunningham quickly searched the freeway and was able to locate the vehicle and get it stopped. The driver, a 33 year old resident of Bellevue was arrested for operating while intoxicated.

PROTECTING YOUR HOME

Home burglaries typically aren't elaborate, well planned heists. Most of the time, burglars are simply looking for an easy mark: unlocked doors, empty houses, and valuables left in plain sight ripe for the picking. On behalf of Home Security Resources, Sheriff Tom Reich shares these valuable tips.

While the most foolproof way to deter burglars is to invest in a home security system, often all you have to do to turn off a burglar's interests is to simply not make it easy to break in. That could be as simple as locking your doors, installing lights, and asking neighbors to pick up mail when you're not home.

We've identified eight of the easiest ways to make your home unattractive to burglars. They're either free or low cost, and often, just require simple, easy tweaks that don't take a lot of effort. Try out these ideas to make your home safer today.
 

#1: Lock Your Doors and Windows

This sounds like a no brainer, but the importance of locking up your home cannot be overstated. Leaving doors or windows unlocked, or worse, open, is like rolling out the red carpet for burglars. All they have to do is walk in.

Think you're not doing it? Someone is. In 2013, 34.3% of burglaries did not require forcible entry. That means in more than a third of burglaries, the burglars were able to gain entry through an unlocked door or window.

It should go without saying, but it's important to always lock your front and back doors, even when you're home. Your windows should be closed when you're not home, and you should lock them as soon as they are closed. Don't forget to lock your upstairs windows, too: it's easy to gain access with a ladder. Also consider the security of your garage door, which can also allow access into your home.

Don't just hand over your key, either. Avoid leaving a spare key out where a burglar can simply pick up a rock and discover it. Instead, give a spare key to a trusted neighbor who you can visit to gain access.
 

#2: Show Signs of Life

Burglars prefer to hit homes where no one is home -- and even better if no one has been at home for a while. That means they can take their time getting in, taking what they want, and getting out. If your home looks like it might be vacant, or even if you're just gone for a few days, you're more likely to be targeted.

Take a look at your front yard. If you've got overgrown grass, a full mailbox, and a few papers to pick up, you're sending a message to burglars that no one is home. Mow your lawn, collect mail, papers, and packages.

If you're going to be away from home, ask for help from neighbors or hire a service to cut your grass or shovel snow so that it appears you're still home. And of course, ask a neighbor or friend to stop by and collect mail and packages.

It's also a good idea to use a timing device around the clock and especially when you won't be home. With a timing device, you can set lights, radio, and other electronics to turn off or on whether you're home or not, giving the appearance that you are at home.
 

#3: Always Answer Your Door

When your door bell rings, you never know who is on the other side of the door. A burglar could be dressed as a solicitor or repair person while attempting to gain access to your home. And while you certainly don't want to open the door and allow them to come in, it's not smart to simply ignore them. Why? Often, burglars will ring the door bell first to see if someone is home. And if you don't answer, you're telling them the house is empty -- and free to explore.

In 2013, almost 30% of burglaries had household members present, and 26% of them became victims of violent crime. It should go without saying that while it's best to never have a burglar in your home, you certainly don't want to be there if it happens.

Instead of ignoring the front door with an unknown person behind it, make yourself known. Use your peephole to see who is there, and if you're not expecting them or don't recognize them, simply tell them you're not interested. They may continue to engage with you to encourage you to open the door, but at this point, you've done your part: you let them know you are home and that your house is no longer an easy target. Most likely, they'll simply walk away and move on to another house.
 

#4: Hide Your Valuables

How easy is it to see what you have in your house? Even behind closed doors, it can be easy to see through windows and garage door windows. If you have a nice camera, large TV, multiple mobile devices, jewelry, or other valuables within sight, burglars may see your home as an attractive target.

Move items away from the view of windows that you may open, or simply keep shades or blinds in easy to see places closed. Consider frosting your garage door windows if you have them. Also, don't leave valuable items like bicycles in your front yard. Not only does this make it easy to take them, it can send a message that you may leave other valuable items lying around as well.

If you make a big purchase like a TV, avoid putting the empty box out as is with your recycling. Break it down, turn it inside out, and try to fit it in the bin with the rest of your recyclables. Otherwise, you could be advertising your new purchase to burglars on the street.
 

#5: Make Entry Points Unattractive

Burglars love a hidden door or window. That means if you have lots of shrubbery or trees near your windows, or if your front door is blocked from view, you're more likely to be burglarized that your neighbors without these issues.

You can't move your front door, but you can install lighting. Make sure that your doors, both front and back, are well lit. Ideally, you should install motion sensing lights that call attention to the presence of movement.

Around windows and fences, trim back any shrubbery that might make it easy for a burglar to hide or gain access. Motion sensing lights are useful in these areas as well. Also, consider thorny shrubs around windows that will make it not just unattractive, but painful for burglars to gain entry into your home.

#6: Store Valuables Away from Your Master Bedroom

It won't stop a burglar from getting into your home, but storing valuables away from your master bedroom can protect your belongings. Usually, the master bedroom is the first place a burglar will look for valuables. They'll see if you have cash or valuables like jewelry in your nightstand, and rifle through the rest of your belongings for electronics, guns, drugs, and more.

It's best to store valuables outside of your master bedroom. Burglars are less likely to look in your attic, basement, hall closets, or kitchen. Even children’s' bedrooms are often bypassed, particularly young children who probably don't have electronics in their rooms. Don't think you're being clever by hiding valuables in the freezer, however. Burglars have known that trick for years.

Your best bet is to get a home safe that is bolted securely to your home. Make it easy for you to access, like in your basement or even in a hall closet, but make sure it isn't easy to remove -- as burglars are happy to just take it with them and work out how to get inside of it later.
 

#7: Never Give Clues You Won't Be Home

Serious burglars spend time staking out the homes they want to hit. They'll watch your patterns, read your social media, and keep an eye out for cars, work schedules, and other details to find their best opportunity to find an open, empty house.

If you have a garage, use it. Parking in your garage makes it difficult for a burglar to know when you're home and when you're not. If there's never a car in the driveway, the absence of one doesn't tell them that you're not home -- it just tells them things are normal.

Predictable patterns can help burglars as well. If you leave for work and return at the exact same time every day, burglars know just how long they have to get in and out before you make it home. Consider breaking routines on a regular basis to show any burglars who might be watching that you could come home and discover them at any time.

Don't send out a message online that you won't be home as well. It's fun to discuss your travel plans, but keep in mind that by doing so, you could be broadcasting to burglars that your home will be empty and easy to access. It's best to simply wait until you get home and post photos of your trip if you'd like.

#8: Get a Best Friend

If you can't be home yourself, a dog is the next best thing. Large breeds are the most intimidating to burglars, as they can be more dangerous if they attack, but regardless of size, any dog that barks is a problem for burglars. Why? A barking dog could alert neighbors to the fact that they have broken in.

Already have a dog at home? Make sure their presence is known. Consider getting a Beware of Dog sign to let burglars know that they won't be opening up an empty house, and will likely be confronted with a dog, small or large.

For more information on home security go to www.homesecurityresource.org/

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


December 2, 2015

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

23 Alarms 49 Car deer accidents
11 Check well beings 21 Domestic disputes
26 Shoplifting

15

Motorist assists
13 Operating while impaired 38 Property damage crashes
15 Suspicious situations 12 Suspicious subjects
15 Suspicious vehicles

17

Traffic hazards
387 Traffic stops 22 Traffic violations

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 977 calls for service.

Snowmobile Safety Class is scheduled for Monday and Tuesday December 7th and 8th. Classes are held from 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office in Charlotte. There is no charge for the class. To register call 517-543-5257.

On Friday, November 27th, Eaton County Deputies responded to a personal injury crash on East Clinton Trail where a vehicle went off the road and struck a power pole and then a tree. The driver was transported to the hospital for treatment of non-life threatening injuries.

Also on November 27th, Eaton County Deputies investigated a personal injury crash on M99 near Bunker Highway. A vehicle traveling northbound on M99 struck a subject walking in the road. The pedestrian was transported to the hospital with serious injuries. The crash is still under investigation.

On Sunday, November 29th, Eaton County Deputies responded to a motorist assist on I69. The responding Deputy checked the license plate which was out of state and finds that there are several warrants in several states. The driver and passenger were arrested and lodged while charges are being sought.

do1thing for December

An emergency can happen at any time and any place. Many public places have a first aid kit, oxygen, or an AED (automated external defibrillator) to treat people. These items can only save lives if someone knows how to use them. Actions you take in the first few minutes after an injury or other medical incident may save someone’s life. On behalf of do1thing, Sheriff Reich offers these tips for being prepared.

            KNOW WHAT TO DO WHILE WAITING FOR AN AMBULANCE

Call 911 instead of trying to take an injured or ill person to the hospital yourself. It seems like waiting for an ambulance will make it take longer to get help, but ambulance crews can start providing care as soon as they arrive. They can get the patient to hospital quickly, legally, and more safely.

  1. Stay on the line with 911 and follow emergency instructions.
  2. Stay calm and try to keep the patient calm.
  3. Don’t move a patient who was injured in an automobile accident or fall, or who was found unconscious.
  4. If the patient is cold, cover them with a blanket.
  5. Don’t give an injured person anything to eat or drink (unless instructed by the 911 dispatcher).
  6. Have someone watch for the ambulance and show the crew how to get to the patient. (This is especially important in an apartment or office building, or if your address is hard to see from the street).

FIRST AID KITS FOR HOME AND CAR

Ready-made first aid kits are available at most department stores or your local American Red Cross chapter. These kits come in a variety of sizes and prices. You can also make your own kit from supplies you probably already have around the house.

Some items that should be included in a basic first aid kit are:

  • Adhesive Tape 
  • Gauze Pads & Roller Gauze (assorted sizes) 
  • Antiseptic Ointment
  • Hand Sanitizer (liquid or wipes) 
  • Band-Aids (assorted sizes)
  • Plastic Bags
  • Blanket
  • Scissors and Tweezers
  • Cold Pack
  • Small Flashlight and Extra Batteries
  • Disposable Gloves
  • Triangular Bandage

TAKE TRAINING

  • Helping others in a medical emergency isn’t as hard to learn as you might think. Knowing how to apply a bandage, identify the signs and symptoms of shock, perform CPR or use an automatic external defibrillator (AED) can save a life.
  • First responders may not be on the scene for five minutes or more. It is up to individuals like you to be ready to help someone who is injured. The person whose life you save may be someone that you love.
  • Many American Red Cross chapters now offer training in pet first aid. Training may also be available through your local humane society, kennel club, or pet store. Check with your veterinarian to see what special items you may need to include in a first aid kit for your pets. If you travel with your pet, or if they are service or hunting animals, you may want to make a travel-sized pet first aid kit as well.
  • Contact your local fire department or American Red Cross chapter to learn what first aid classes are available in your area. Ask your employer if they will sponsor a class for your workplace, or take a class with your family or on your own. Many classes are offered free of charge. Courses may also be offered at your place of worship, school, or community organization. Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training also includes first aid training.

do1thing calendars are available at the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office and will assist in planning each month for being prepared in the event of an emergency or disaster.

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich


November 25, 2015

Sheriff Tom Reich, Eaton County Sheriff’s Office

In the past week the Eaton County Deputies have responded to:

31 Alarms 27 Assist Citizens
70 Car/deer accidents 40 Cars in ditch
16 Check well beings

19

Domestic dispute
25 Shoplifting 16 Larcenies
11 Motorist assists 16 Operating while impaired
11 Personal injury crashes

70

Property damage crashes
15 Suspicious Situations 31 Traffic hazards
252 Traffic stops 23 Traffic violations

Overall the Eaton County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 1008 calls for service.

Snowmobile Safety Class is scheduled for Monday and Tuesday December 7th and 8th. Classes are held from 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office in Charlotte. There is no charge for the class. To register call 517-543-5257.

On Thursday, November 19th, Eaton County Deputies assisted Barry County in locating a possible B&E suspect and vehicle with Eaton County.

HOLIDAY SAFE SHOPPING

  • Stay alert and be aware of what’s going on around you.
  • Keep a record of all your credit card numbers in a safe place at home.
  • Keep cash in your front pocket.
  • Deter pickpockets and purse-snatchers.  Carry a purse close to the body, not dangling by the straps.
  • Put your wallet in an inside coat or front pants pocket.
  • Never leave a purse unattended in a shopping cart.
  • Never carry large amounts of cash.  Whenever possible use credit cards, debit cards or checks.
  • Shopping with a single credit card is safer because it’s easier to cancel one card than several if stolen.
  • Don’t swipe your credit card at the checkout, instead, ask the cashier to run it through the register. Identity thieves are compromising terminals, just like gas pumps.
  • Report lost or stolen credit, debit and ATM cards immediately. Reporting quickly limits liability for unauthorized charges.
  • Beware of strangers approaching you for any reason. At this time of year, “con-artists” may try various methods of distracting you with the intention of taking your money or belongings
  • Park in a well-lighted space, and be sure to lock the car, close the windows and hide shopping bags and gifts in the trunk.
  • When returning to the car or home always have the keys in hand, ready to open the door.
  • Before entering the vehicle carefully check the front and rear seats and floors for anyone that may be hiding there.
  • Shop during daylight hours whenever possible. If you must shop at night go with friends or relatives.  There is safety in numbers.
  • Dress casually and comfortably, avoid wearing expensive jewelry.
  • If possible, leave small children at home with a trusted babysitter.
  • Teach your child their full name, address and telephone number.
  • Teach children to go to a store clerk or security guard if they are separated or lost.
  • Never allow children to make unaccompanied trips to the restroom.
  • NEVER leave children in a car alone.

Yours in Public Safety,

Sheriff Tom Reich

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Either of these forms can be mailed to us at 1025 Independence Blvd, Charlotte, MI 48813, Faxed to 517-543-2922

or emailed to treich@eatoncounty.org and they will be put on file with Central Dispatch  

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